Region: Pacific Coast / Filter: city


Acapulco was one of Mexico’s first beach areas to become popular. It is no wonder these early tourists were captivated, since Acapulco has a stunning natural setting. Today, the aura of secluded bliss in the downtown area of Acapulco has faded behind rows of high-rise hotels (ma... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

From Uruapan, go north for about 13 kilometers on highway 37, turn left, and continue for another 20 kilometers to Angahuan. Here you will find plenty of guides eager to rent you horses and guide you to see the covered town (a 6-kilometer round trip). Arrangements can be made also to ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Costa Alegre, considered one of Mexico’s greatest undiscovered treasures, is becoming a favored hideaway both for celebrities and the wealthy seeking seclusion in a natural paradise. Alternatively referred to as Costa Alegre (Happy Coast) or Costa Careyes (Turtle Coast) after th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you want to combine a bit of archaeology with your beach holiday, you can drive about an hour east of Manzanillo up into the lush mountains to Colima. This is a clean, attractive working city with a pretty Colonial plaza where you find the excellent Museum of Archaeology. Originall... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Guadalajara is often called the City of Roses. Guadalajara is a huge, modern, cosmopolitan city with over 5 million inhabitants. It is studded with shady parks, statues highlighting small plazas, tree-lined boulevards, fine museums, world-class restaurants, handsome residential areas,... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Commonly referred to as the Bahías de Huatulco (Bays of Hautulco), Huatulco is based around nine bays and 35 kilometers of beaches. After the tremendous success of Cancún, the Mexican government looked for an equivalent site to start a new tourist destination on the... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Located west of Cuernavaca, the impressive hilltop site of Malinalco (A.D. 500–1521) was inhabited over the years by various groups of people but reached its peak during the final years of the Aztec Period (c. A.D. 1475–1521). The ruins are reached by climbing almost a mil... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Manzanillo? Never heard of it? Except to the Canadians, who come in droves during their bitterly cold winter, Manzanillo is a relatively unknown destination. It’s located on the west coast of Mexico, about 250 kilometers south of Puerto Vallarta. Manzanillo doesn’t have th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Reserve a full day to visit Mitla (A.D. 900–1521), since there are places to see along the way. Mitla is located 46 kilometers east of Oaxaca on highway 190, and your first (quick) stop en route is in Santa María del Tule, 9 kilometers outside Oaxaca. Here you find the fa... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Morelia, the capital of the state of Michoacán, is an attractive, tidy, modern city with many upscale stores and elegant men and women bustling to and fro. If you circumvent the center of town, you totally miss the best part: its fabulous historic center where you step instantl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Oaxaca, tucked high in a fertile valley 485 kilometers southeast of Mexico City, is one of our favorite places in Mexico. Without a doubt it is one of the most colorful, best-preserved Colonial cities in the country, with the added bonus of a lovely climate year round. It also offers ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Palenque, one of the most beautiful ancient cities discovered in the Americas, is tucked in the jungle where the Usumacinta River drainage meets the coastal plain of the Gulf of Mexico. Due to the interest and dedicated scholarship of a number of talented epigraphers and art historian... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Pátzcuaro, a small Colonial gem with a strong Indian heritage, is one of our favorite destinations. For the first-time traveler to Mexico wanting to visit just one charming Colonial town, San Miguel de Allende might be a better choice since it is more sophisticated with chic bo... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Puerto Vallarta has a scenic location on the sea with the Sierra Madre foothills behind it, and the ornate crown of the Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe serving as a photogenic landmark. It is a quaint, picturesque town with cobblestone streets, Colonial buildings, traditiona... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The newest tourist area is north of Puerto Vallarta, just across the border in the state of Nayarit in an area of spectacular beauty called Punta Mita. The stunning Four Seasons was the first hotel to be built here, but more are soon to follow. For some reason the beaches here are of ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If your time is limited, after spending a couple of nights in Palenque return to the Yucatán Peninsula and continue on to Río Bec (see the next destination). However, for those interested in anthropology and delving into the rich culture of the Mayan people, then San Cri... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Founded in 1605, San Sebastian del Oeste is an extremely picturesque village tucked high in the mountains with narrow cobblestone streets lined by white adobe houses with rustic red-tiled roofs. This remote, long-forgotten hamlet was once the most important silver and gold mining town... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Taxco, which is designated as a national monument, is one of Mexico’s quaintest Colonial towns. Being close to Mexico City and on the route to Acapulco, it has many tourists and is a bit more commercial than some other silver towns that are more off the beaten path. Nevertheless... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

From Pátzcuaro, take the toll road west for 60 kilometers to Uruapan, a bustling commercial town that would win no beauty contests but is very important as it lies at the heart of Mexico’s vast avocado plantations. Eduardo Ruiz National Park, on the outskirts of town, is ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

To the southwest of Cuernavaca you find the site of the pre-Hispanic city of Xochicalco (c. A.D. 650–900), one of several that rose to power after the fall of the great metropolis of Teotihuacán. The disintegration of that immense city left a power vacuum throughout the r... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Zihuatanejo and Ixtapa are really two resorts in one. Ixtapa, 10 kilometers northwest of Zihuatanejo, is a modern resort full of luxury high-rise hotels set along 7 kilometers of curving beach, Playa Palmar. Zihuatanejo, in contrast, with low-rise buildings only, sits in a scenic shel... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The closest town to the best known of the butterfly sanctuaries is Angangueo, a tiny town squeezed in a narrow, mountain valley where silver was mined from 1792 to 1992. The village has just one cobbled road cutting through the middle and leading up to the 3,000-meter mountaintop. Alt... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended