Region: Wales / Filter: attraction


This is the only medieval merchant's house in Conwy to have survived the turbulent history of the walled town over nearly six centuries. Furnished rooms and an audio-visual presentation show daily life from different periods in its history.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Beaumaris Castle, the last of the castles built by Edward I in his attempt to control Wales, is a squat, moated fortress with grassy grounds inside thick walls facing a harbor full of sailboats.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Bodnant Gardens

Garden lovers will enjoy almost a hundred acres of camellias, rhododendrons, magnolias, and laburnum, which provide incredible displays of spring color. Above are terraces, lawns, and formal rose and flower beds; below, in a wooded valley, a stream runs through the secluded, wild gard... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Brecon Beacons National Park

Leaving Tretower, continue down the lane, beside the house, and turn right on the A40. If the weather is fine, you can enjoy an almost circular driving tour through the Brecon Beacons by turning left towards Llangynidr and, after crossing the river, taking a right turn to Cwm Cronon a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Edward I laid the foundations of Caernarfon Castle in 1283 after his armies had defeated the princes of North Wales. Many revolts against English rule took place in this imposing fortress and during the Civil War it was one of Cromwell’s strongholds. The first English Prince of ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Conwy Castle was begun in the 13th century for Edward I and suffered the scars of the turbulent years of the Middle Ages and the Civil War. The defensive complex includes an exhibit on Edward I and his castles in Wales. On the top floor of the Chapel Tower is a scale model of how the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Dolwyddelan Castle, a 13th-century keep built by Prince Llewyn which was captured by Edward I and subsequently restored in the 19th century.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Your first stop lies beneath the looming dam at the information center where a small display outlines the importance and history of clean drinking water and gives details on the vast reservoirs that provide 76 million gallons of drinking water a day. Returning to the road, follow it a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Porthmadog, the terminus of the hard-working little Ffestiniog Narrow-Gauge Railway, which runs to and from nearby Ffestiniog. The train provides riders with a mobile viewpoint from which to enjoy the most spectacular scenery as it follows the coast and chugs up into rugged Snowdonia,... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The adorable little train that once served the slate quarries now puffs along 2 miles of track by the edge of the lake beneath the towering mountains. On fine days you have lovely views of Snowdon. (rarely do you have to book in advance)... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Exhibits show the importance of slate mining but the most exciting part of a visit here is to travel underground into the deep mine and follow a walking tour through the caverns.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The village of Llanberis is the starting point for the ascent of the highest mountain in Wales, Mount Snowdon. Easier than the rugged walking ascent is the two-hour round-trip journey on the Snowdon Mountain Railway, an adorable “toy” steam train that pushes its carriages ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leave England on the M4 crossing the Severn toll bridge. The first indication that you are in another country is that all road signs appear in two languages, Welsh first, English second. As you leave the bridge take the first left turnoff signed A466 Monmouth and the Wye Valley. Th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A fabulous sham castle built as a grand home by a local slate magnate in the 19th century. This impressive house of intricate masonry and woodwork is filled with stupendous furniture.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Y Goeden Eirin: This is a truly stunning village created by the eminent architect Sir CLough Williams-Ellis. It has been built in the Italian style, and includes cottages, shops, a luxury hotel, restaurants/cafes, and another hotel on the outskirts. Over the years s... more

  • Property Recommended

Raglan Castle is the last of the medieval castles, dating from the later Middle Ages when its builders could afford to indulge in decorative touches. It was begun in 1431 and its Great Tower was rendered the ruin you see today by Oliver Cromwell’s demolition engineers. A huge fi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Easier than the rugged walking ascent is the two-hour round-trip journey on the Snowdon Mountain Railway, an adorable “toy” steam train that pushes its carriages up the mountainside on a rack-and-pinion railway. The little train winds you along the edges of precipices and ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Snowdonia National Park (Snowdonia) is a region of wild mountains which, while they cannot be compared in size to the Alps or the Rockies (Snowdon rises to 3,560 feet), are nevertheless dramatically beautiful with ravines and sheer cliffs whose sides plummet into glacier-cut valleys s... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Tintern Abbey, a romantic ruin adored by the sentimental Victorians. Drive alongside the ruin to the car park at the rear by the tourist office.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The castle, a sturdy keep, was usurped as a habitation in the 14th century by nearby Tretower Court, a grand mansion that was the home of the Vaughan family for three centuries. As you walk through the empty medieval hall and along the stone passageways, you can imagine how splendid a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended