Region: South West / Filter: attraction


At The Sign of The Angel is a delightful 15th-century inn, easily distinguished by being the only black-and-white building in the village.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The village of Avebury (NT), made up of a church, several houses, shops, and an old pub, lies within a vast circle of standing stones surrounded by earthworks. The site covers 28 acres. Unlike Stonehenge, where the stones are larger, the site smaller and the crowds sometimes overwhelm... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Eighteenth-century society came to be seen at balls and gatherings at the Assembly Rooms and authors such as Austen, Smolett, and Fielding captured the social importance of these events. The Museum of Costume, in the Assembly Rooms basement, should not be missed. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Buckland Abbey

Buckland Abbey (NT), once a Cistercian abbey and home of Sir Francis Drake, is now a museum with scale model ships from Drake’s time to today among its many exhibits. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Rather than visit over-commercialized Land’s End, visit here to enjoy a less crowded, more pastoral western view over the Atlantic. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Castle Drogo (NT) is a fanciful, castlelike home designed by Edward Lutyens overlooking the moor near Drewsteignton. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Claverton Manor is the American museum in the United Kingdom. Furniture, household equipment, and period rooms show home life in the United States from the 17th to 19th centuries. (3 miles east of Bath.)... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Ednovean Farm: I'm afraid you can't e-mail nature but last week my American guests abandond their car at Ednvoean Farm and instead walked the coastal footpath each day, for two days adventures. One day they walked westwards along the low earthy cliffs edged with tam... more

  • Property Recommended

Cotehele (NT), built between 1485 and 1627, the home of the Edgecumbe family. The house contains original furniture, armor, and needlework. A highlight is the kitchen with all its wonderful old implements. The gardens terrace steeply down to the lovely River Tamar.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Dartmoor National Park. Vast expanses of moorland rise to rocky outcrops (tors and crags) where ponies and sheep graze intently among the bracken and heather, falling to picturesque wooded valleys where villages shelter beneath the moor. From Mortenhampstead it’s a half-hour dri... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Dunster Castle (NT) was Constructed by a Norman baron and has been inhabited by the Luttrell family since 1376. Much of the castle was reconstructed in the last century and has a superb staircase, halls, and dining room. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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On Mill Lane you can tour 18th-century Dunster Watermill (NT), which was restored to working order in 1979.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The Eden Project is set in a former china clay pit in the hills above St Austell. The aim of this project is to promote the understanding and responsible management of the vital relationship between plants, people, and resources. At the bottom of the giant crater are the world’s... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Be sure to visit the Fox Talbot Museum of early photographs and Lacock Abbey. The abbey was converted to a manor house in the 16th century but retains its 13th-century cloisters.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The ruins that you see are those of the enormous Glastonbury Abbey complex that was begun in the 13th century and closed by Henry VIII just as it was completed. The abbey is in the center of town. Legend also has it that Glastonbury (at that time surrounded by marshes and lakes) was t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The view from atop Haytor Crags on the Bovey to Widecombe road is a spectacular one—there is a feel of The Hound of the Baskervilles to the place.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leaving Lynmouth, proceed up the hill into Lynton, and follow signs for the alternative route for light vehicles to Valley of the Rocks. Wend your way through the town and continue straight. Beyond the suburbs the road tapers and you find yourself in a narrow valley with large, rugged... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The road from Falmouth to St. Mawes winds around the river estuary by way of Truro. A faster and more scenic route is to take the King Harry Ferry across the river estuary. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The expression “from John O’Groats to Land’s End” signifies the length of Britain from its northeasternmost point in Scotland to England’s rocky promontory, Land’s End, in the southwest. Many visitors to Cornwall visit Land’s End, but be prepa... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Set in a vast estate and surrounded by formal gardens, Llanhydrock showcases what was the very latest in contemporary living in 1881—there’s even central heating. It looks as though the family has just stepped out, leaving the dining table laid for an elaborate party, toys in the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Overlooking Mevagissey lie the expansive estates of the Tremayne family, centered at one time on Heligan House and its vast acres of gardens and woodlands. There used to be 20 staff in the house and 22 in the garden but all this ended in the 1914–18 war when two-thirds of the garden... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Softer and prettier than the view from atop Haytor Crags is the walk down wooded Lydford Gorge (NT) to White Lady Waterfall (between Tavistock and Okehampton).... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Overlooking the holiday resort, yachting center, and ancient port of Falmouth are the ruins of Pendennis Castle. Built in 1540 to guard the harbor entrance, it was held during the Civil War by the Royalists and withstood six months of siege before being the last castle to surrender to... more

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Roman Baths

The city of Bath is named for its famous Roman Baths. Entry into the Roman Baths is via the Pump Room, which was the place to gather in the 18th and 19th centuries. The Great Bath, a large warm swimming pool built around a natural hot spring, now open to the sky, was once covered. Mos... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Salisbury Cathedral, the only ancient English cathedral built to a single design. Completed in 1258, it sits gracefully isolated from the busy town, surrounded by a large green field.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Sally Lunn's House

Nearby to the Roman Baths, tucked into a narrow passageway between Abbey Green and North Parade, is Sally Lunn’s House, a museum and a teashop. The museum, in the cellar, has the kitchen preserved much as it was in the 1680s when Sally’s buns and other baked goods were the favorit... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Pull into Sennen Cove with its long, curving crescent of golden sand and the powerful Atlantic surf rolling and pounding. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The most dramatic scenery of Beachy Head, the Seven Sisters, giant, white, windswept cliffs, are an invigorating walk from the visitors’ center. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leave Penzance on the A30 following the graceful sweep of Mount’s Bay and turn right onto a minor road that brings you to St. Michael’s Mount (NT). Its resemblance to the more famous mount in France is not coincidental, for it was founded by monks from Mont St. Michel in 1... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Britain’s most famous ancient monument is Stonehenge. Built over a period of almost 1,000 years up to 1250 B.C., this circular arrangement of towering stone slabs was probably meant either to mark the seasons or to be used as a symbol of worship. It is intriguing to ponder what ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Fore Street leads you to the quaint harbor while a left on Digbey will bring you to the Tate Gallery on Porthmeor Beach. Whistler and Sickert discovered St. Ives while sculptress Barbara Hepworth and painter Ben Nicholson made it famous. Admission to the Tate also includes admission t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Tintagel Castle clings to a wild headland, exposed to coastal winds, claiming the honor of being King Arthur’s legendary birthplace. The sea has cut deeply into the slate cliffs, isolating the castle. Climb the steep steps to the castle and gaze down at the sea far below. Prince... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Absolutely adorable. The most photographed post office in Britain.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Adjacent to King Harry Ferry on the Falmouth side of the estuary. A delightful garden full of sub-tropical plants.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

From Lynton follow signs for the alternative route for light vehicles to Valley of the Rocks. Wend your way through the town and continue straight. Beyond the suburbs the road tapers and you find yourself in a narrow valley with large, rugged rock formations separating you from the se... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The cathedral’s west front is magnificently adorned with 400 statues of saints, angels, and prophets. The interior is lovely and on every hour the Great Clock comes alive as figures of four knights joust and one is unseated. From the cathedral you come to Vicars Close, a cobbled... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended