Region: Provence Alps Cote DAzur / Filter: attraction


The skyline of Arles can be seen as you approach the city. Abounding in character, this is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. On the outskirts of the city, surrounded by fields, stand the ruins of Abbaye de Montmajour, which was built i... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Just four kilometers from the ever popular town of Gordes is Senanque and the Abbaye. Detour to Senanque to visit its 12th-century Cistercian abbey which stands dramatically isolated at the edge of the mountainside surrounded by lavender and oak trees. Vacated by the monks in 1869 a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Saint Rémy de Provence, a pretty, sleepy town, nestled in the shade of its plane trees. Of interest in the town are a Romanesque church, Renaissance houses, and a busy public square. On its outskirts, following the D5 south in the direction of Les Baux de Provence, is the Clini... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theat... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theaters i... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix is an enchanting, beautiful and aristocratic city to explore. The beckoning cobblestoned streets of its Old Quarter are intriguing to wander along at night and the illuminated tree-lined Cours Mirabeau is enchanting—a bit reminiscent of Paris with its many sidewalk caf&eacut... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

When traveling the Gorges du Verdon, on the northern outskirts of Trigance is a spectacular vista of the dramatic Verdon at the Balcons de la Mescla. You can pull off here, and there are terraced points from which you can look down at the dramatic loop in the path of the river some 7... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cannes is the center for many festivals, the most famous being the Cannes Film Festival held annually in May. The Boulevard de la Croisette is a wide street bordered by palm trees separating the beach from the elaborate grand hotels and apartment buildings. La Croissette is congested ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Marseille is the second-largest city in France. Settled as a Phoenician colony, this major Mediterranean port is where our Provence itinerary begins. Apart from the Roman docks and fortified church of Saint Victor, there are few monuments to its past within the city. However, you must... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Avignon was the papal residency from 1309 to 1377 and the Palais des Papes is a highlight of a visit to this lovely city—if only to stand on the main square and look up at the long, soft-yellow stone structure that dominates the city skyline, stretching the length of the square ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix en Provence is an elegant city. Aix achieved fame when “Good King René,” count of Provence, and his wife chose it as their preferred residence in the 1450s. Upon his death Aix fell under the rule of the French crown and was made the seat of parliament. The city flourished in ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Mas de L'Oulivie: Enter Cathedrale of Images located in the impressive limestone quarries of les Baux-de-Provence to experience the magical audiovisual program which changes each year. The effects take the visitor to the very heart of a universe of images on walls, f... more

  • Property Recommended

On the western edge of the dense Forest of Vénasque is a beautiful and striking hilltop village of Vénasque. Charmingly untouched by civilization, this village is tucked in a dense forest cupped between two steep hills and is notable for its 6th-century Église de... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Vence is located just 10 kilometers above the coast and Riviera. The hillsides surrounding Vence afford a lovely coastal panorama and are dotted with palatial homes and villas. Entering through the gates into the old village, you find dozens of tiny streets with interesting shops and ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Antibes—allow at least half a day for exploring this waterfront fortress. Fort Carré, not to be confused with the Château de Grimaldi, is closed to the public and located on the south entrance of town. The fort guards the waters of Antibes, which is home to thousand... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Mas de l’Oulivie: Situé au coeur du Parc Naturel Régional des Alpilles, le site du Château des Baux est l’un des endroits les plus extraordinaires de France et s’étend sur plus de 7 hectares. Découvrez le donjon, les tours fortifiées, les machines de si... more

  • Property Recommended

Cagnes sur Mer is on the waterfront, a port town struggling to resemble the other coastal centers. Haut de Cagnes, however, is an old section located on the hill, with an abundance of charm and character. Follow narrow, steep, cobbled streets to the heart of the old village. Opt for t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by  Domaine des Clos: The Chateau of Tarascon is one of the most beautiful fortresses of Europe. It was built by the Roi René (King René) from 1400 -1435 and sits on the bank of the Rhône River overlooking Beaucaire and its garrison castle. Its architecture resemble... more

  • Property Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. The territory mapped out and referred to as Cimiez is where the Romans constructed Cemenelum, a town to rival the then existin... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Saint Rémy de Provence, a pretty, sleepy town, nestled in the shade of its plane trees. Of interest in the town are a Romanesque church, Renaissance houses, and a busy public square. On its outskirts, following the D5 south in the direction of Les Baux de Provence, is the Clinique de... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the French Riviera travelling between the coastal towns of Nice and Menton, you have a choice of three roads that all run somewhat parallel to each other following the contours of the coast. The Grande Corniche or “high” road was built by Napoleon and passes through pi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

To explore the Gorges du Verdon it is possible to follow the south bank or the north bank of the canyon. (If time and enthusiasm allow, it is also possible to make one grand circle journey traveling both sides of the canyon.) The routing that follows the south bank is termed the Corni... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix is an enchanting, beautiful and aristocratic city to explore. The beckoning cobblestoned streets of its Old Quarter are intriguing to wander along at night and the illuminated tree-lined Cours Mirabeau is enchanting—a bit reminiscent of Paris with its many sidewalk caf&eacut... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the western edge of the dense Forest of Vénasque is a beautiful and striking hilltop village of Vénasque. Charmingly untouched by civilization, this village is tucked in a dense forest cupped between two steep hills and is notable for its 6th-century Église de... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Avignon was the papal residency from 1309 to 1377 and the Palais des Papes is a highlight of a visit to this lovely city—if only to stand on the main square and look up at the long, soft-yellow stone structure that dominates the city skyline, stretching the length of the square and ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

When traveling the Gorges du Verdon there are many spectacular and dramatic vantage points from which to watch the river cut its path. From Artuby the road climbs on the fringe of the ravine to the Fayet Pass. Here a tunnel carves through the rock and square openings through the thick... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The market town of Cavaillon is known for its melon fields and wonderful markets. On the outskirts of Cavaillon, to the east, is the amazing Fontaine de Vaucluse, fed by rainwater that seeps through the Vaucluse Plateau . In the late afternoon as the sun begins its descent, walk aroun... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Antibes—allow at least half a day for exploring this waterfront fortress. Fort Carré, not to be confused with the Château de Grimaldi, is closed to the public and located on the south entrance of town. The fort guards the waters of Antibes, which is home to thousand... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Considered a gateway to Provence, Avignon is one of France’s most interesting and beautiful cities. Villeneuve les Avignon is separated from Avignon by the Rhône. Villeneuve flourished when the pope held residence in Avignon and a number of cardinals chose it for their ma... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The picturesque mountain stronghold of Saint Paul de Vence, once guarded the ancient Var Frontier. Cars are forbidden inside the walls of the old town whose cobbled streets are lined with galleries and tourist shops. From the encircling ramparts you get panoramic views of the hillto... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Picasso settled in Vallauris after his time in Antibes and tested his skill at the potter’s wheel, producing thousands of pieces of pottery using the Madoura pottery shop as his atelier. He restored the craft and brought fame to the village and in gratitude the town made him an... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Saint Rémy de Provence, a pretty, sleepy town, nestled in the shade of its plane trees. Of interest in the town are a Romanesque church, Renaissance houses, and a busy public square. On its outskirts, following the D5 south in the direction of Les Baux de Provence, is the Clini... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the hills above the French Riviera is a very scenic drive that follows the path of the Loup River as it weaves through the Gorges du Loup. The canyon’s beauty and its high granite walls beckon you into the ever-narrowing gorge. The River Loup flows far below, only visible t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the French Riviera travelling between the coastal towns of Nice and Menton, you have a choice of three roads that all run somewhat parallel to each other following the contours of the coast. The Grande Corniche or “high” road was built by Napoleon and passes through pi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Hotel l'Auberge du Choucas: Les Grands Bains is the largest thermo-leisure center in the French Alps. The buildings of the hot springs cover over 4500 square meters. Besides the soothing, some say medicinal waters, the center offers spa treatments and a restaurant w... more

  • Property Recommended

Recommended by Hotel l'Auberge du Choucas: One of the most beautiful alpine gardens in Europe. The garden displays over 2000 species of plants found in mountain regions throughout the world. To view the flowers at their peak visit throughout July and until mid August The gardens ar... more

  • Property Recommended

Menton boasts streets shaded by fruit trees and stretches of sandy beach in addition to a colorful harbor, casino, and an endless array of shops. At the heart of the old town, Rue Saint Michel is a charming shopping street restricted to foot traffic. The nearby Place aux Herbes and Pl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. On the other side of the River Paillon is the old quarter of Nice, La Vieille Ville, full of character and ambiance. Narrow alle... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

When traveling the Gorges du Verdon there are many spectacular and dramatic vantage points from which to watch the river cut its path. The road periodically veers away from the edge of the canyon and rolls past beautiful green meadows dotted by a few mountain cabins and hamlets. In sp... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Hotel de l'Auberge du Choucas: The second largest artificial lake in Europe was originally planned(1895) to control the flooding caused by melting snow. By the time it was built(1961) the dam housed a hydro-electric plant and had been sized to supply: irrigation wate... more

  • Property Recommended

Recommended by Mas de l’Oulivie: The "Vallée des Baux de Provence" AOC (guaranteed origin) labels for black crushed olives, picked olives and olive oil were awarded in 1997. Catherine and Jean-Benoît Hugues have shaped in their own image this 45-hectare estate of olive trees (1... more

  • Property Recommended

Fontvieille is a small roadside town located between the lovely Roman city of Arles and Les Baux. It is home to the Moulin de Daudet, an abandoned mill set on the hillside above town, reputedly where Daudet wrote Letters from My Windmill. On the outskirts of Fontvieille, on the D33, ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Moustiers Sainte Marie, famous for its pottery, is a wonderful village whose cluster of buildings with their patchwork of red-tiled roofs hugs the hillside and crawls back into the protection of a sheltered mountain alcove. Monks came here in 433, took shelter in caves dug into the mo... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the French Riviera travelling between the coastal towns of Nice and Menton, you have a choice of three roads that all run somewhat parallel to each other following the contours of the coast. The Grande Corniche or “high” road was built by Napoleon and passes through pi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Considered a gateway to Provence, Avignon is one of France’s most interesting and beautiful cities. Avignon is fun to explore—a wonderful selection of shops line its streets, a festive air prevails with numerous street performers, and the historical attractions are monumental. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. The territory mapped out and referred to as Cimiez is where the Romans constructed Cemenelum, a town to rival the then existing... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. The territory mapped out and referred to as Cimiez is where the Romans constructed Cemenelum, a town to rival the then existing ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Hotel l'Auberge du Choucas: The Museum of Sacred Art is located in the St. Peter's Chapel. Housed are religious artifacts collected from the churches and chapels near Monetier les Bains. The collection pieces generally date from the 15th to 19th centuries.... more

  • Property Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theaters i... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix is an enchanting, beautiful and aristocratic city to explore. The beckoning cobblestoned streets of its Old Quarter are intriguing to wander along at night and the illuminated tree-lined Cours Mirabeau is enchanting—a bit reminiscent of Paris with its many sidewalk caf&eacut... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The road along the French Riviera follows the bay of Golfe Juan and stretches to Pointe de la Croisette in Cannes. From here you can detour into the hills just up from the town of Golfe Juan to Vallauris. Picasso settled in Vallauris after his time in Antibes and tested his skill at t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. Along the waterfront, the Promenade des Anglais takes a grand sweep from the city’s western edge along the Baie des Anges ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Marseille is the second-largest city in France. Settled as a Phoenician colony, this major Mediterranean port is where our Provence itinerary begins. Apart from the Roman docks and fortified church of Saint Victor, there are few monuments to its past within the city. The old port has ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. Along the waterfront, the Promenade des Anglais takes a grand sweep from the city’s western edge along the Baie des Anges ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. The territory mapped out and referred to as Cimiez is where the Romans constructed Cemenelum, a town to rival the then existing... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Antibes—allow at least half a day for exploring this waterfront fortress. Fort Carré, not to be confused with the Château de Grimaldi, is closed to the public and located on the south entrance of town. The fort guards the waters of Antibes, which is home to thousand... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cagnes sur Mer is on the waterfront, a port town struggling to resemble the other coastal centers. Haut de Cagnes, however, is an old section located on the hill, with an abundance of charm and character. Follow narrow, steep, cobbled streets to the heart of the old village. Opt for t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theat... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

As you travel the cobblestoned streets of the Old Quarter of Aix en Provence you might want to take a moment to visit the Museum of Tapestries. On display is an impressive collection of nineteen 17th-century tapestries from Beauvois. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Endeared as one of France’s most beautiful villages, Gourdon is an unspoiled gem that commands an absolutely spectacular setting as it hugs and clings to the walls of the steep hillside. Vistas from the village look north down the Loup Canyon or southeast over the countryside do... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

This is a beautiful Provençal hilltown whose narrow, winding streets offer a wealth of stores displaying the famous Moustiers pottery. It is a wonderful village whose cluster of buildings with their patchwork of red-tiled roofs hugs the hillside and crawls back into the prote... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix is an enchanting, beautiful and aristocratic city to explore. The beckoning cobblestoned streets of its Old Quarter are intriguing to wander along at night and the illuminated tree-lined Cours Mirabeau is enchanting—a bit reminiscent of Paris with its many sidewalk caf&eacut... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Considered a gateway to Provence, Avignon is one of France’s most interesting and beautiful cities. Avignon was the papal residency from 1309 to 1377 and the Palais des Papes is a highlight of a visit to this lovely city—if only to stand on the main square and look up... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

First-class hotels and excellent restaurants are numerous in Monte Carlo, catering to the millions of annual visitors who come to play in its casino and hope to catch a glimpse of the royal family or resident international celebrities. Monaco is independent of French rule, and an excl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Hotel L'Auberge du Choucas:  This beautiful vast national park is filled with hiking trails ranging from novice to expert as well as offering wonderful terrain for mountaineers. The geology and biology associated with the Ecrins has led to these mountains and park b... more

  • Property Recommended

At the heart of a region of lavender, roses, carnations, violets, jasmine, olives, and oranges is the hilltown of Grasse. Grasse’s initial industry was the tanning of imported sheepskins from Provence and Italy. It was Catherine de Medicis who introduced the concept of perfume w... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

At the heart of a region of lavender, roses, carnations, violets, jasmine, olives, and oranges is the hilltown of Grasse. Grasse’s initial industry was the tanning of imported sheepskins from Provence and Italy. It was Catherine de Medicis who introduced the concept of perfume w... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

At the heart of a region of lavender, roses, carnations, violets, jasmine, olives, and oranges is the hilltown of Grasse. Grasse’s initial industry was the tanning of imported sheepskins from Provence and Italy. It was Catherine de Medicis who introduced the concept of perfume... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Considered a gateway to Provence, Avignon is one of France’s most interesting and beautiful cities. Villeneuve les Avignon is separated from Avignon by the Rhône. Villeneuve flourished when the pope held residence in Avignon and a number of cardinals chose it for their mag... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theat... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. Along the waterfront, the Promenade des Anglais takes a grand sweep from the city’s western edge along the Baie des Anges ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

When traveling the Gorges du Verdon there are many spectacular and dramatic vantage points from which to watch the river cut its path. From Mescla the road winds through sparse vegetation of boxwood and then crosses over a dramatic span, the Pont de l’Artugy, a concrete, one-... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Considered a gateway to Provence, Avignon is one of France’s most interesting and beautiful cities. Avignon is fun to explore—a wonderful selection of shops line its streets, a festive air prevails with numerous street performers, and the historical attractions are monumen... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nice is a large city whose population of 400,000 has carpeted the land with apartments and condominiums bounded only by the ocean and the surrounding hills. Along the waterfront, the Promenade des Anglais takes a grand sweep from the city’s western edge along the Baie des Anges ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Fontvieille is a small roadside town located between the lovely Roman city of Arles and Les Baux. It is home to the Moulin de Daudet, an abandoned mill set on the hillside above town, reputedly where Daudet wrote Letters from My Windmill. On the outskirts of Fontvieille, on the D33, ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by La Locandiera: The well regarded Sailing School of Cagnes sur Mer offers classes for all ages between March and December. The active fishing port is an interesting visit with a morning fish market and an adjacent four mile promenade along the beach.... more

  • Property Recommended

A thriving city, Apt is known for its crystallized fruits and preserves, truffles, lavender perfume, and old Sainte Anne Cathedral, which is still the site of an annual pilgrimage.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the hills above the French Riviera is a very scenic drive that follows the path of the Loup River as it weaves through the Gorges du Loup. The canyon’s beauty and its high granite walls beckon you into the ever-narrowing gorge. The River Loup flows far below, only visible to ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cannes is the center for many festivals, the most famous being the Cannes Film Festival held annually in May. Rising above the port at the western end of the popular Boulevard de la Croisette is Le Suquet, the old quarter of Cannes, which has a superior view of the colorful port.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cannes is the center for many festivals, the most famous being the Cannes Film Festival held annually in May. The old port (Vieux Port) is a melange of fishing boats and sleek luxury craft. You find the flower market, Fortville, along the Allées de la Liberté and the bou... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The hillside village of Gordes is known for the ancient village of 20 restored bories, or dry-stone huts, that lie in its shadow. Unusual in their round or rectangular shapes, these intriguing buildings (many of which accommodate 20th-century comforts) are thought to date from the 1... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended