Region: Pennsylvania / Filter: attraction


Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway is reputed to be the greatest place to learn about dinosaurs. The museum exhibits more than more than 30 different species, about half of which are the full skeletal remains. The academy has much more to o... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

After visiting the region and many of the advertised locales, we found the Amish Country Homestead by far the best and the most comprehensive and rewarding in terms of a glimpse and understanding of the Amish. Located between the charming towns of Bird-in-Hand and Intercourse on Route... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Amish Farm and House create an educational living museum giving a glimpse into the history and still daily lives of the Amish living in Lancaster County. There are a number of demonstrations, from quilts to wood carvings, displaying the activities of the Amish. The Amish Village ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Amish Village of Strasburg is one of the fine examples of an exhibit allowing a better understanding and appreciation of the Amish Culture. It affords a glimpse into the lifestyle and culture of the Amish. Located on 12 scenic acres, visitors are able to tour an authentic Amish ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Benjamin Franklin Parkway leading from the center of the city was modeled after the Champs Elysées in Paris. It stretches from City Hall to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the beginning of Fairmont Park. Within this area there are many worthwhile places to visit, includi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Betsy Ross House: The home of Betsy Ross, the Quaker seamstress who made the first Stars and Stripes flag, is well worth a brief visit for the legends that are now associated with the role of the flag in our country’s history. (239 Arch Street, 215-686-1252)... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford is located in a converted Civil War grist mill. The museum focuses on the artwork of the Wyeth family—probably the most noted of all artistic families in America. The works of N. C. Wyeth his son Andrew, and in turn his son Jamie are hu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Traveling a little farther, southwest of Philadelphia on Route 1 you will find yourself in the Brandywine Valley. This area in the southeast corner of the state abutting Delaware has a rich history, starting with the arrival in 1682 of William Penn, and offers many attractions includi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Bucks County, Pennsylvania, is full of historical charm and conveniently close to Philadelphia. Our suggested routing begins in this delightful area, extends your journey along the Delaware River as it winds its way north, and ends in the Pocono Mountains. Each segment of the trip is ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Nicknamed the "Niagara of Pennsylvania", Bushkill Falls is created as the waters of the Bushkill and Pond River Creeks rush through a rock canyon creating eight falls.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul, erected along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, is an Italian Renaissance-style cathedral built for the Irish Catholic immigrants who came to settle in Philadelphia. This magnificient cathedral was built in 1864 using the Lombard Church of St. Char... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Christ Church: Dating back to 1695, Christ Church is one of the nation’s most historic churches. The architecture is magnificent and well worth a visit. (North 2nd and Church Streets, 215-922-1695.)... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Center City: Anchored by some of the city’s finest architecture, the modern Center City is Philadelphia’s vibrant downtown area. Next to old buildings with restaurants, theaters, shopping areas with great boutiques, and grand department stores, there is architecture dating... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Congress Hall: This was built in 1787 as the home of the Philadelphia County Courthouse but was actually used as the hall where the delegates of the newly founded country met—the Senate in the second-floor courtroom and the House of Representatives in the first-floor chamber.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Have you ever wondered how and where crayons are made? Ever had a desire to see crayons made? Here your dreams are answered as this is the home of all things Crayola. Enable your inner child with a visit to this wonderful factory.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Located at the heart of Gettysburg, you will want to take time to visit the David Wills House. David Wills was the man responsible for the Gettysburg cemetery.  President Lincoln, his invited guest, spent the night in his home the evening before he gave the famous Gettysburg Address.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Here you find recreational activity of every available type year round. Whether you enjoy fishing and boating on a lake, skiing on a mountain, whitewater rafting on a fast-running river, hiking, biking, horseback riding, or camping, all these and more are available in the Delaware Wat... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Once there, or in planning your trip in advance, you should contact the Pennsylvania Dutch Convention and Visitors’ Bureau, 501 Greenfield Road, Lancaster, PA 17601, 800-723-8824.www.800padutch.com Other information centers include the Downtown Lancaster Visitors’ Center a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Eckley Miners’ Village is a model coal-mining town with an interesting visitors’ center. The village, in the anthracite region of Pennsylvaina, traces the history and effects of mining, from underground to strip mining, on the people and land.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Eisenhower National Historic Site adjacent to the Gettysburg National Military Park includes the the Eisenhower home and farm complete with furnishings of the former President. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Elfreth’s Alley which dates back to 1702 is referred to as "Our nation’s oldest residential street." dating to 1702. Walk down this street (located between Front and 2nd Streets just north of Arch), lined with 33 narrow brick houses that date back to the 1720s -  a journey back... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Elfreth’s Alley: Take the time to walk down this street, between North 2nd and Front Streets, lined with 33 narrow brick houses dating back to 1725. The alley is considered this country's oldest residential street dating back before the revolution. The preservation of the al... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Ephrata Cloister, 632 W. Main Street in Ephrata (northeast of Lancaster on Route 222) provides guided tours of several of the religious commune’s original Germanic-style buildings. This National Historic Landmark was the site of the ultimately failed religous community found... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the area of Fairmont Park, one of the largest city parks in the world, are the Museum of Art; historic homes; the Horticulture Center an azalea garden; the Fairmont Water Works Interpretive Center and the Philadelphia Zoo. Philadelphia's massive park system covers over 9200 acr... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Fairmont Water Works originally evolved as a result of municipal responsibility. In the late 18th century, yellow fever outbreaks were thought to be the result of a water borne disease. To combat this, Philadelphia was one of the first U.S. cities to take over and supply its inha... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A little farther north you come to Fallingwater, acknowledged as one of the greatest 20th-century architectural achievements in America and designed by Frank Lloyd Wright when he was 68 years old. What inspired Wright was the opportunity to merge one of the most beautiful of all sites... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The architect, archaeologist, and ceramist Henry Chapman Mercer built three buildings now open to the public—Fonthill, his castle-like home (215-348-9461), the Mercer Museum, with its collections of pre-industrial artifacts (215-345-0210), and the Spruance Library at the museum ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Franklin Court: This was originally built as the home of Benjamin Franklin and now houses audio presentations of his life and his many accomplishments. The 18th-century printing office and bindery of Benjamin Franklin’s grandson has also been re-created in this building.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Franklin Institute Science Museum is another of the worthwhile stops along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. This museum has a science center with exhibits for children and adults, the Fels Planetarium, a Victorian railroad station with a steam locomotive, a walk-through version of the h... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Incredibly over 6,000 acres have been preserved as the Gettysburg National Military Park (open all year from 6 am to 10 pm), securing for all time one of our history’s most poignant battles and a war, tragically fought brother against brother, friend against friend, countryman a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Five miles south of downtown Lancaster off Route 222 an interesting visit may be made to the Hans Herr House at 1849 Hans Herr Drive. This restored home, the oldest in the county, was the home of Hans Herr who with a small group of Mennonites escaped religious persecution in Germany i... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Independence Hall: Constructed as the Pennsylvania State House between the period of 1732 and 1756, this is a modest brick structure with a bell tower in which the Liberty Bell hung. Tours of this building should include the large central hall, the Assembly Room, the second-floor Long... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Independence National Historic Park lies at the heart of historic Philadelphia. This area covers approximately 12 blocks and contains all the most important historic sites. The visitors’ center, located at 3rd and Chestnut Streets, is the place to begin your visit—don&rsqu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Institute of Contemporary Art on the University of Pennsylvania campus promotes the appreciation and enjoyment of both established and new artists in the world of contemporary art.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The museum, named for the Pullitzer Prize winning novelist, was built in 1988 and stemmed from Michener's long standing patronage of the arts. In addition to the wonderful artworks on display there is a permanent ehibition on Michener, the man and his works. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

From the I-68 west of Grantsville, take Route 40 west to Farmington, Pennsylvania and then drive north on Route 381 towards your goal of Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece, Fallingwater. However, before you get there, you might want to stop at Kentuck Knob, another Frank Lloyd Wri... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In Lancaster County farming has long been a way of life for the Amish and the Mennonites. With their unique style of life centered around their deeply felt religious beliefs, these people and the land on which they live have become magnets for visitors for over 300 years. Whether the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Liberty Bell Pavilion: This building was newly constructed for the Bicentennial Celebration in 1976 and now houses the Liberty Bell. There is an especially wonderful talk here by national park rangers on the history of the Liberty Bell, its creation, and it’s subsequent recastin... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A little farther along Route 1 from Chadds Ford, you come to Longwood Gardens. Pierre du Pont, one of the members of the family that founded the DuPont Company, expressed his interest in horticulture through the purchase of more than 1,000 acres of gardens, conservatories, and fountai... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Also in the city center area is the Masonic Temple (1 North Broad Street, 215-988-1917). Many of this country's founding fathers were Masons and in some ways this magnificent temple memorializes them. The temple is one of the largest of its kind.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The architect, archaeologist, and ceramist Henry Chapman Mercer built three buildings now open to the public—Fonthill, his castle-like home (215-348-9461), the Mercer Museum, with its collections of pre-industrial artifacts (215-345-0210), and the Spruance Library at the museum ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The town of Hershey is referred to as the city of chocolate, with the Milton S. Hershey Museum, Hershey’s Chocolate World, and Hershey Gardens. If chocolate is a passion of yours, then you will enjoy the tourism that has grown with the success of Milton S. Hershey, the creator of th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The museum still produces tiles in the style of the pottery founder, Henry Chapman Mercer. See, Fonthill, Mercer Museum and Spruance Library for other attractions inspired or built by Mercer in the area.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Museum of American Art of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts is located in Center City District of Pennsylvania. The museum has a quality collection of American artists, ranging from colonial to present day, on permanent display as well as revolving exhibitions of notewor... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In West Philadelphia you find the University of Pennsylvania, between South 34th Street and South 40th Street, with the university’s Institute of Contemporary Art (215-898-7108) and the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

There was a day when tow-path canals were an important form of travel. Mules pulled extremely heavy crafts along these canals. This museum tells the story of this once important form of transportation.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Old City: This area, the heart of the original city of Philadelphia, has been extensively restored and includes galleries, restaurants, and various historic buildings. It’s located a few blocks north of the Independence National Historical Park, south of Race Street and east of ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Old City Hall: The mirror image of the Congress Hall, this building served for a while as the home of the Supreme Court. It has now been restored to show how it looked when it served as the nation’s highest court.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Penn’s Landing and South Street: This area along the Delaware River, between Chestnut and Spruce Streets, is a recreational area with parks, jogging and walking paths, a skating rink, an amphitheater, and a seaport museum. The Seaport Museum displays permanent exhibits, two hist... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is one of the major art museums in the United States both in structure size and scope of the collections.With more than 200 galleries solely for the art work, a full day may not be enough time to do this museum justice. On Friday evenings the museum spon... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Philadelphia Zoo on the edge of Fairmont Park was the first zoo built in the United States. The zoo is now home to over 1600 animals from all over the world and is one of the foremost authorities in the conservation and education regarding wildlife around the world.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Physick House: Dr. Philip Physick, known as the father of American surgery, lived in this house with his family from 1815 to 1837 and his descendents lived here until 1940. The building has been restored to be a showpiece of the Federal period. (321 South 4th Street, 215-925-7866, Vis... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the town of Strasburg is the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. (From Lancaster take Route 896 then turn east on Route 741 for 1 mile.) For those interested in trains—either full-size or model trains—this is the place to visit. Across the street from the museum, the Strasburg Rai... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Rodin Museum along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway was opened in 1929 through the largesse of Mrs. Mastbaum and her late husband, Jules, whose dream it had been to exhibit his collection of Rodin pieces. The exhibits of the drawings and sculpture of Auguste Rodin is one of the large... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Rosenbach Museum and Library is located in the Center City District of Philadelphia. Rare books, manuscripts, artifacts and paraphernalia of famous authors are the strengths of this museum although many of their exhibits venture outside the written word.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Second Bank of the United States and the National Portrait Gallery: This Greek-Revival building with its marble columns was opened in 1824 as the Second Bank of the United States under a 20-year Act of Congress. Subsequently this structure was the Philadelphia Custom House and now has... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Society Hill: With a great deal of history dating back to the 18th century, the streets and houses of this part of Philadelphia, bounded on one side by Independence Hall and Lombard Street and on the east and west sides by South Second and South Fifth Streets, have now been restored.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The architect, archaeologist, and ceramist Henry Chapman Mercer built three buildings now open to the public—Fonthill, his castle-like home (215-348-9461), the Mercer Museum, with its collections of pre-industrial artifacts (215-345-0210), and the Spruance Library at the museum ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The State Museum of Pennsylvania, 3rd and North Streets in Harrisburg, houses and features the arts and artifacts of the state. The planetarium, in particular, has some interesting exhibits to explore. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A visit here will acquaint you with the history both of steam engines and the coal industry as well as the people associated with them. Train excursions powered by either steam or diesel powered locomotives are available at Steamtown. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Barnes Foundation is located only 5 miles south of the Philadelphia’s city center via I-76 to Route 1 in the town of Merion. The gallery was built by Dr. Albert Barnes, a wealthy physician and pharmaceutical manufacturer, to house his incredible art collection. This now includes... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Seaport Museum displays permanent exhibits, two historic ships, and continually changing traveling exhibits. (211 South Columbus Boulevard, 215-925-5439.)... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

United States Mint: This is the largest of all the United States mints. There is a self-guided tour of the building showing historical information on the creation of coins and commemorative medals. You can look down through windows onto the floors where coins are being produced today.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The University of Pennsylvania was founded by, among others, Benjamin Franklin and opened in 1751. It was the first liberal arts college in America as Franklin's intention was to train young men for business and the service of their country rather than the long held belief, at th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The extensive collections of artifacts and exhibits at the University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology make it a worthwhile visit. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Also on the outskirts of Philadelphia, Valley Forge National Park is 20 miles northwest of the city, via I-76 west. For those interested in the War of Independence, this visit is one not to miss. It was in Valley Forge that George Washington’s army of 12,000 troops camped in the... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

History buffs can visit the Washington Crossing National Park, where George Washington was said to have crossed the Delaware River. The park and museum also honor and showcase other local battles and events important to the outcome of the revolutionary war.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

While exploring Lancaster County, as well as becoming acquainted with the Amish community, those interested in things that tick will want to visit the Watch and Clock Museum located 10 miles west of Lancaster in Columbia. Take Route 30 west to Route 441 and then go left on Poplar... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Another interesting stop would include Wheatland, the home of President James Buchanan, located at 1120 Marietta Avenue. This mansion is elegantly decorated with the furniture gathered during his years in Washington. Delving into the life of America's only bachelor president makes... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended