Region: Leinster / Filter: attraction


The main road takes you through the Vale of Avoca to the “Meeting of the Waters” at the confluence of the rivers Avonmore and Avonbeg. Detour into Avoca to visit the Avoca Handweavers. You are welcome to wander amongst the skeins and bobbins of brightly hued wool to see th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Travel south through the village of Rathdrum where sturdy stone cottages line the street, and continue through the crossroad following signposts for Avondale House, the home of Charles Stewart Parnell. Parnell was born into the ruling Anglo-Irish gentry; but, due in part to the influe... more

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The somber, windowless Bank of Ireland began life in 1729 as the seat of the Irish parliament.... more

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Follow the railings of Trinity College to the Kilkenny Design Centre and Blarney Woolen Mills, fine places to shop for Irish crafts and clothing.... more

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In the library, a display center houses the jewel of Trinity College, the Book of Kells, a Latin text of the Four Gospels. A page of this magnificent, illuminated manuscript is turned every month and if you are not overly impressed by the page on display, return to the library booksho... more

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If you decide not to visit the Guinness Brewery on Thomas Street, cross diagonally from the Dublin Walls to the Brazen Head in Bridge Street, where you can enjoy that same brew in Dublin’s oldest pub. There has been a tavern on this site since Viking times, though the present, r... more

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Brown Thomas, a large department store on Grafton Street, is popular with visitors.... more

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Walk along Dame Street past Dublin’s most famous 1960s “modern” building, the Central Bank, which looks like egg boxes on stilts. Go under the bank and you are in Temple Bar.... more

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Returning to Dame Street, you pass City Hall and, on your right, the impressive Christ Church Cathedral comes into view. Dedicated in 1192, it has been rebuilt and restored many times. After the Reformation when the Protestant religion was imposed on the Irish people, it became a Prot... more

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Returning to Dame Street, you pass City Hall. Tour the 'Story of the Capital' in the restored building designed by Thomas Cooley and erected around 1769-79. There is an entrance fee but make use of the free audio tours.... more

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Returning to Dame Street and a more sedate side of Dublin, you come to Dublin Castle, built in the early 13th century on the site of an earlier Danish fortification. The adjoining 18th-century State Apartments with their ornate furnishings are more impressive inside than out.... more

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Make your first stop the Dublin Tourism Centre, in a sturdy, granite church on Suffolk Street. Here you can book sightseeing tours; purchase ferry, train, and bus tickets; arrange lodgings; find out what is in Dublin—and enjoy a cup of coffee. (Tel: 01 605 7720, www.visitdublin.... more

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At the north end of Parnell Square in a restored 18th-century mansion, you find the Dublin Writers Museum, where you can view the paintings and memorabilia with an audio tape telling you all about them. Among those featured are George Bernard Shaw, William Butler Yeats, Oscar Wilde, J... more

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At the junction of High Street and Bridge Street, pause to climb the restored remains of a portion of Dublin’s Walls. When they were built in 1240, the walls fronted onto the River Liffey.... more

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Joined to the Christ Church Cathedral by a covered bridge arching across the street is Dublina, where you learn the history of Dublin through an audio-visual display. You conclude your tour at the large-scale model of the city and the gift shop.... more

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Amidst the gray stone housesof Enniscorthy, built on steeply sloping ground by the River Slaney, lies a Norman castle. Rebuilt in 1586, the castle houses a folk museum that includes exhibits from the Stone Age to the present day, with emphasis on the part played by local people in the... more

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Strolling along the Inns Quay, you come to the Four Courts, the supreme and high courts of Ireland. You can look inside the fine, circular waiting hall under the beautiful green dome, which allows light through its apex.... more

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The reknowned theatre was founded in 1928 and recently renovated. If time allows don't miss the oppurtunity to view a play here.... more

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The General Post Office, or GPO as it is affectionately known, is a national shrine known as the headquarters of the Easter Rebellion and the following revolution.... more

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The monastery at Glendalough was originally founded in County Wicklow by Saint Kevin during the 6th century. St. Kevin came to the area of Glendalough (Irish  meaning- "The valley of the two lakes") seeking a site to lead a quiet solitary life of contemplation. It was h... more

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Below Glenmacnass Waterfall, the valley opens up to a patchwork of fields beckoning you to Laragh and Glendalough. There is a footpath to the falls from the parking lot near the top of Mt. Mullaghcleevaun, the tallest mountain in the region.... more

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Grafton Street, which is closed to vehicles, is teeming with people and enlivened by street musicians. Its large, department store, Brown Thomas, is popular with visitors. At the end of Grafton Street, dodge the hurrying buses and cross into the peaceful tranquility of St. Stephen&rs... more

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Stroll into Clare Street, stopping to browse in Greene’s Bookstore with its lovely, old façade and tables of books outside.... more

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Just down Thomas Street is that thriving Dublin institution, the Guinness Brewery, whence flows the national drink. As you near your goal, the smell of roasting grains permeates the air. The Guinness Storehouse, a 7-story glass atrium, is built on the site where Arthur Guinness first ... more

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Turn up Capel Street and make the third right onto Mary Street which leads to the busiest pedestrian shopping street in Dublin, Henry Street.... more

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Leaving the Kennedy Homestead, continue along the country lane to the main road and the John F. Kennedy Arboretum, a memorial to the slain president of row upon row of trees... more

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Take the N30 towards Waterford and just before New Ross, turn left towards Arthurstown. After about 1 kilometer, turn right for the Kennedy Homestead in Dunganstown, where the great-grandfather of American President John F. Kennedy lived before being driven from Ireland by the terribl... more

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Kilkenny Castle was originally built between 1195 and 1207. The imposing building, as it now stands, is a mixture of Tudor and Gothic design and is definitely worth a visit. The east wing picture gallery is flooded by natural light from the skylights in the roof and displays a collect... more

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Follow the railings of Trinity College to the Kilkenny Design Centre and Blarney Woolen Mills, fine places to shop for Irish crafts and clothing.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Opposite the Kilkenny Castle entrance, the stables now house the Kilkenny Design Centre, a retail outlet for goods of Irish design and production: silver jewelry, knits, textiles, furniture, and crafts.... more

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Leave the Kennedy Arboretum towards Arthurstown and, at the first Y in the road, take the right-hand fork for the short drive to Great Island and Kilmokea at Campile with its 7 acres of lovely gardens. Around the house are the formal, walled gardens and a heavy, wooden door set into t... more

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Leinster House, the Irish Parliament, consists of two chambers—the Dáil, the lower house, and the Seanad, the upper house or senate. You can tour the building when parliament is not in session. The main entrance is located on Kildare Street.... more

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Take a short detour from shopping on Henry Street and stroll down Moore Street through Dublin’s colorful open-air fruit, vegetable, and flower market.... more

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The trees and plants comprising Mount Usher Gardens have been gathered from around the world and incorporated along the Vartry river. The gardens have been planted in a natural style marrying the new plantings with the surrounding native woodlands and shrubs. The magnificent scenery o... more

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Adjacent to the parliament building is the National Gallery of Ireland, which is a Victorian building with about 3,000 works of art. There’s a major collection of Ireland’s greatest painter, Jack Yeats, and works by Canaletto, Goya, Titian, El Greco, Poussin, Manet, Picass... more

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On Kildare Street you will find the National Museum displaying all the finest treasures of the country. There are marvelous examples of gold, bronze, and other ornaments, as well as relics of the Viking occupation of Dublin—the 8th-century Tara Brooch is perhaps the best-known i... more

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On the far side of the square, at 85 and 86 St. Stephen’s Green, is Newman House, once the home of the old Catholic University (later University College Dublin), which boasted James Joyce amongst its distinguished graduates. Number 85 is restored to its pristine, aristocratic ye... more

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This is an area noted for its craftspeople (leatherworkers, potters, painters) and culinary artists, resulting in a plethora of restaurants and craft shops in the surrounding villages, making this a very interesting area in which to spend several days. I always head for the Nicholas M... more

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Merrion Square is one of Dublin’s finest remaining Georgian squares and the onetime home of several famous personages—William Butler Yeats lived at 82 and earlier at 52, Daniel O’Connell at 51, and Oscar Wilde’s parents occupied number 1. The jewel of Merrion S... more

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Our walking tour begins at the southern end of O’Connell Street where O’Connell Bridge spans the River Liffey dividing the north from the south of Dublin. (It is also just by the city center terminus for buses: those displaying “An Lar,” meaning city center, us... more

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O’Connell Street has its share of tourist traps and hamburger stores, but it’s a lively bunch of Dubliners who walk its promenades—placard-carrying nuns, nurses collecting for charity, hawkers of fruit, flowers, and plastic trinkets—all are there for you to see... more

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The Passage East ferry takes you from Arthurstown across the estuary to Passage East, the tiny village on the western shores of Waterford harbor.... more

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Follow the winding, wooded lane to Enniskerry and bear left in the center of the village. This brings you to the main gates of Powerscourt Gardens. As you drive through the vast, parklike grounds, the mountains of Wicklow appear before you, decked in every shade of green. Powerscourt ... more

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Leaving the car park at Powerscourt Gardens, turn left for the 6-kilometer drive to the foot of Powerscourt Waterfall, the highest waterfall in Ireland and a favorite summer picnic place for many Dubliners.... more

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Stroll up High Street into Parliament Street to Rothe House. The house, built in 1594 as the home of Elizabethan merchant John Rothe, is now a museum depicting how such a merchant lived.... more

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As you come upon open moorland from Enniskerry, take the first turn left for the 8-kilometer uphill drive to the summit of Sally Gap. This road is known as the “old military road” because it follows the path that the British built across these wild mountains to aid them in... more

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A walking tour starts from the tourist office in the Shee Alms House, just a short distance from Kilkenny Castle.... more

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On north side of the square at St. Stephen's Green make a stop at the landmark Shelbourne Hotel, long recommended as the perfect place to enjoy afternoon tea.... more

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You should also see St. Canice’s Cathedral at the top of Parliament Street. The round tower dates from the 6th century, when St. Canice founded a monastic order here. Building began on the cathedral in 1251, though most of the lovely church you see today is an 1864 restoration.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Glendalough, a monastic settlement of seven churches, was founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century. After St. Patrick, St. Kevin is Ireland’s most popular saint. He certainly picked a stunning site in this wooded valley between two lakes to found his monastic order. Amidst the ti... more

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At the end of Grafton Street, dodge the hurrying buses and cross into the peaceful tranquility of St. Stephen’s Green, an island of flowers, trees, and grass surrounding small lakes dotted with ducks... more

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Adjoining the Dublin Castle are the 18th-century State Apartments with their ornate furnishings. The apartments are more impressive inside than out.... more

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Another point of interestin the Christ Church Cathedral is Strongbow’s Tomb: he was one of the most famous Norman lords of Ireland and, by tradition, debts were paid across his tomb. When a wall collapsed and crushed it, a replacement—an unknown crusader’s tomb&mdash... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Go under the Central Bank and you are in Temple Bar, with its narrow cobbled streets and little old buildings. In the daytime it’s a place of coffee houses and little shops. At night its narrow streets become very vibrant as the clubs open with many good pubs and lots of restaur... more

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Enter through the front arch of Trinity College into the cobbled square. Founded in 1591 by Elizabeth I, it contains a fine collection of buildings from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Cross the square to the library, where a display center houses the jewel of Trinity College, the Boo... more

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The settings of the lakes of Lough Dan and Lough in the Wicklow Mountains are some of the most beautiful views in Ireland. The lakes, set in a Valley in the Wicklow Mountains, offer amazing photo opportunities, especially when the heather is in bloom, creating a mass of purple as f... more

  • Property Recommended