germany-bavaria

Spain Cities


Aguilar De La Frontera

Aguilar de la Frontera appears, is a old hilltop town whose whitewashed, octagonal plaza of San José is particularly charming.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alba de Tormes, dominated by the 16th-century Torre de la Armería, the only remnant of a former castle of the Dukes of Alba—among the greatest land barons of their time. This small town is one of the most popular pilgrimage destinations in Spain because Santa Teresa of Ávila... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Albarracín

Albarracín is designated as a historical monument by the national government.This whimsical town looks as if it were carved into the living rock below the ruined castle whose towers reach toward the sky.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Go on to Plasencia from Yuste, turning north on N630. If you have time, we heartily recommend a detour (you need to have a detailed map and be prepared to drive winding roads) to La Alberca, northwest on SA515 beyond Bejar. This tiny, isolated town has preserved its historic charm to an unusual... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alcalá La Real is a beautiful town. There are a large variety of shops all situated around the large picturesque park in the centre.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alcañiz

Alcaniz, has many wonderful places to visit are the Excolegiata, the Gothic paintings in the Torre del Homenaje, the Medieval "Pasadizos" (corridors), the City Hall, and the Gothic "Lonja" (marketplace).... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alcaudete is dominated by a ruined castle.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alcázar de San Juan is a wine-trade town.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Alhambra with its Generalife Gardens takes a complete day to visit. The ticket booths open at 9 am and it is handy to be there a few minutes early to avoid lines. Alhambra comes from the Arabic name “Red Fort” and, although it is red, its somewhat plain exterior belies the richn... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Almagro, once the main stronghold of the knights of the military Order of Calatrava who battled the Moors during the Reconquest. Almagro’s unique, oblong Plaza Mayor is surrounded by wooden houses—many of which are cafes and restaurants—and the restored 16th-century Corral de ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The roads wind along the coast through the small seaside resort of Almuñécar, with its ruined Castillo de San Miguel.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you want a daytrip that combines scenery with shopping, shopping, shopping, you can take a daytrip from Seu d’Urgell to Andorra, cross into France, and return to Seu. Just 9 kilometers north of Seu, you reach the border of the tiny principality of Andorra, which is under the joint admi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Andújar, has a pretty little plaza dominated by an ochre-colored Gothic church and an arched Roman bridge across the Guadalquivir. You are now in the major olive-producing region of Spain.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arcos de la Frontera is one of the many charming towns dotting the hills that rise from the Costa del Sol. Its setting is very special—the indisputably beautiful town is set on a rocky promontory with cliffs dropping down to the Guadalete River. The town has narrow, sloping streets lined ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arévalo

Leave Madrid, heading northwest on the A6 freeway until it turns into NVI and continue north towards Zamora. After a few kilometers, you pass Arevalo, one of the oldest towns in Castile; where, in a 14th-century castle, Isabella spent her early years. She was born in nearby Madrigal de Las Alta... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arzúa

Arzúa is a stop on the medieval pilgrims’ route.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Avila

Ávila cannot help being on every list of special places. Located conveniently close to Madrid, the town is one of the best-preserved in Spain. Try to approach from the west where you get the most impressive first impact of the town—you will be astounded by the perfection of the 12th-century... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Azaila

Azaila sits atop its rocky cliffs.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Baena is tiered gracefully on a hillside. In the upper, walled part of town are some wonderful Renaissance mansions.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Baeza was the seat of a bishop during the Visigothic period and a prominent border town between Andalusia and La Mancha during the Reconquest. Golden seignorial mansions testify to its importance as a Moorish capital before 1227, when it became the first Andalusian town to be reconque... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Baiona

Baiona, whose former inhabitants were the first to hear the news of the discovery of the New World when the Pinta moored here in 1493 (the Santa María sought refuge in Lisbon after a storm). Subsequently, it continued to be a major port for the many gold- and silver-laden ships that followed t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Barcelona is a vivacious city that blends the historic structures of the old town with the scores of buildings left by the upsurge of modernism. Street signs (and maps) are often in the Catalan language. In Barcelona, you see carrer instead of calle for street, passeig instead of paseo for pas... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Begur is a hilltop town just inland of the coast. Its castle ruins offer a nice view of the town and its maze of streets. From the town you have excellent views of the coast.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Belchite

Belchite was extensively destroyed during the Civil War (1936–39). The rebuilt town stands next to the ruins of the former one, a grim monument to the horror of that conflict. The old town soon appears on the right as you leave: an eerie moonscape of bombed-out buildings, houses, and church.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Besalú is well worth a visit. Skirt the town until you pass the old bridge on your right (park and walk into town). Stroll the streets with its shops and restaurants. Sit for a while and soak up the atmosphere of the town’s colorful square. The tourist office by the bridge will sup... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Bilbao is a huge city whose most outstanding tourist attraction is the Guggenheim Museum with its prime location along the bank of the Nervión River, with the Puente de La Salve, one of the city’s main bridges, above it. Designed by Los Angeles architect Frank Gehry, it makes a sta... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Burgos is a large, not particularly charming city, but of historical interest. The capital of Old Castile from 951 to 1492 (when it lost its position to Valladolid), Burgos, has strong associations with the victorious Reconquest. Spain’s epic hero, El Cid Campeador (champion), was born Ro... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Near Cabra are the ruins of the Castillo de los Condes and San Juan Bautista church, one of the oldest in Andalusia.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cáceres, now a modern, congested city except for the wonderful old town (Barrio Monumental), was hotly disputed during civil wars between Castile, León, and Extremadura, which explains its extraordinary fortifications. Incredibly well preserved, the walls are mostly of Moorish con... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cadaques is a whitewashed and picturesque fishing town/artist colony that surrounds the harbor.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Calatayud

Calatayud is built up against a hillside, crowned by the minaret of an old mosque and the ruins of the Moorish Kalat-Ayub (Castle of Ayub). You might want to stop for a closer inspection of the Mudéjar tower sitting impressively atop its rocky ridge above the hillside covered with tiny houses.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Campo de Criptana where it is claimed, Don Quixote had his tryst with the windmills.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cangas de Onís is a most attractive town, well worth a detour—it has a picture-perfect, 13th-century, humpbacked bridge adjacent to the modern road bridge.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Follow the Rio Cardoner through red, pine-covered ridges, punctuated with little farming towns, to Cardona, beautifully situated and crowned by an outstanding fortress/castle, which just happens to be the Parador de Cardona. This magnificent parador retains much of its 10th- and 11th-century co... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cariñena

Cariñena is a little town famous for its wine.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Carmona

Carmona is located just a short drive east of Seville and makes a delightful day’s excursion, or overnight. The walled city crowns a small hill that rises out of the vast plains of the Guadalquivir. The main entrance is on the lower level through the old Moorish gates, leading to a maze of na... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Caseres

About 8 kilometers past Calaceite, at Caseres, you officially enter Catalonia. Since Catalonians speak (in addition to Spanish) their own language, Catalan, you find a number of words spelled differently from the way you may be used to (e.g., river is riu instead of río).... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Castellfollit de la Roca

Castellfollit of the Rock is a town at the confluence of the rivers Fluvià and Toronell. Here is where the  spectacular basaltic wall rises.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Back on the main itinerary route you pass through the fertile plains of the Campo de Calatrava as you pass Daimiel and Ciudad Real on the way to the interesting town of Almagro, once the main stronghold of the knights of the military Order of Calatrava who battled the Moors during the Reconques... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The road turns south to skirt the bay and continues inland through cultivated farmland around Colindres, where you regain sight of the sea. Shortly afterward, you bypass Laredo, a popular seaside resort with a beautiful, large beach on Santona Bay. The freeway moves away from the coast, for a b... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Continue to Basella, then turn north, following the Segre River for the 50-kilometer drive to Seu d’Urgell. At this point, the Pyrenees begin to show their brooding presence in the distance ahead. Cross the Segre to reach the aquamarine Oliana reservoir. From the banks of the reservoir, y... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Consuegra

The municipality comprises of the zone of production of four products that excel by their quality: the Cheese, Vino, the Saffron and the Extra Virgin Olive oil. A total of eleven mills marks to the silhouette and the landscape of Consuegra, emphasizing among them, denominated Sancho, that is in... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Córdoba was the most opulent of the Moorish cities in Spain and is today a vast vibrant city. Córdoba is such a popular destination that it sometimes seems that every person who comes to Spain stops here. Park by the river and walk into historic heart of Córdoba, the old Barrio de la Juderí... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

La Coruña

If you need an excuse to extend your stay in the area there are some interesting side trips. If quaint, fishing villages and gorgeous scenery appeal, get some bread, some smooth Galician San Simön cheese, and slightly sparkling, white ribeiro wine and head west on C543 to Noya, turning north o... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cuenca

Cuenca is only about a two-hour drive southeast of Madrid, yet is not as well-known as many of Spain’s towns that, in our estimation, are not nearly as spectacular. If time allows, definitely include Cuenca—and plan to stay for several days because there is so much to see in the area: the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the main route you pass through the fertile plains of the Campo de Calatrava as you pass Daimiel and Ciudad Real on the way to the interesting town of Almagro, once the main stronghold of the knights of the military Order of Calatrava who battled the Moors during the Reconquest. Almagro&rsqu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Daroca

The town of Daroca is a beautifully situated medieval town still enclosed by crumbling 13th-century walls with 114 towers. Park near the first gate you come to and take time to stroll along the Calle Mayor, visit the church of Santa María church, and the Plaza Mayor.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

El Escorial

A better way to go, in our opinion, is to drive yourself. This allows you to allocate your time as you please. These towns are all close to Madrid and close to each other. If you leave very early in the morning and plan just a short time in each, you could see El Escorial, Ávila, and Segovia t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you enjoy ceramics and embroidery, note that this region is the national font for their manufacture (it used to be that you knew where tiles had been made by the colors used), so you might want to do a little shopping along your route today. Return to EX102 and turn left toward Puerto de San... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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