germany-bavaria

New England Attractions


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The Acadia National Park is an unforgettable experience and will cap your trip on the Maine coast, well worth the effort of getting there. Plan on at least one overnight in this area if you intend to spend any time in the Acadia National Park (we have inn recommendations in Bar Harbor and North... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Ridgefield is only an hour north of New York, but you would never know it from the rural character of this lovely town. Old trees line the streets and front the gracious homes, many of which date back to the 18th and early 19th centuries. Here you will find the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Ar... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Buttonwood Inn: Arethusa Falls was discovered by Edward Tuckerman and named by Professor Huntington and Moses Sweetser in 1875. The name comes from the Percy Bysshe Shelley poem describing the story of a nymph named Arethusa who was turned into a fountain to avoid being the lo... more

  • Property Recommended

 Back Bay, with its commercial and shopping areas, begins at the Boston Common, a 50-acre park in the center of the city. The adjacent Public Garden (the first public botanical garden in the country), with its guide-pedaled swan boats and wonderful duck statues found along its network of p... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A detour onto Beacon Hill, an area where early merchants built homes and where the Capitol Building(State House) is located, is well worth the time. Prior to the revolution, the Beacon Hill area was predominately pasture land with the exception of John Hancock's estate. Most of the existin... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you’ve spent the night in the Salem and Marblehead area, you’ll now be facing the choice of a second day on the North Shore or moving onward into Maine. I recommend that you drive to Gloucester to visit Beauport, the Cape Ann Historical Museum, and, if time permits, the Hammond C... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leaving Williamstown, cross into Vermont and continue on to Old Bennington, a charming village dating back to the 18th century and steeped in Colonial history, which lies 9 miles to the west of the commercial town of Bennington on Route 9. Allow time for the walking tour (maps available at the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you want to enjoy the music of the Boston Symphony Orchestra at the Tanglewood Music Festival, held each summer since the 1930s, then you need to make plans to extend your stay. There are several halls in which these musical events take place, but there is nothing like sitting on the lawn wi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Boston Common is the oldest park in the history of the United States.  It is a 50 acre park with many historical monuments.  ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

For children, there are two museums of particular note: The Boston Museum of Science, located by the Charles River, offers an array of educational exhibits that invite active participation in the world of science and technology. (This museum is fascinating and I urge you to make time for it in ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Boston Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s most famous, performs throughout the fall, winter, and spring seasons in Symphony Hall and during the summer at Tanglewood in the Berkshires. The Boston Pops, with its programs of lighter music, performs in summer at Symphony Hall and in f... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Boston Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s most famous, performs throughout the fall, winter, and spring seasons in Symphony Hall and during the summer at Tanglewood in the Berkshires. The Boston Pops, with its programs of lighter music, performs in summer at Symphony Hall and in f... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Across the river, neighboring Cambridge is home to Harvard University, Radcliffe College, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Around these academic communities has developed a maze of commercial and residential neighborhoods, artists’ studios, and theaters. On the Harvard campu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Brunswick is home to Bowdoin College, a well-regarded liberal arts school, and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art with its collections of early-American portraits and (annually from mid-May until mid-August) a display of the paintings, etchings, and memorabilia of the artist Winslow Homer. The p... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

North of Freeport is the community of Brunswick, home of Bowdoin College and the Bowdoin College Museum of Art with its collections of early-American portraits and (annually from mid-May until mid-August) a display of the paintings, etchings, and memorabilia of the artist Winslow Homer. The par... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leaving Newport, head back north on Routes 114 and 136 to I-195 into Providence. With a concerned effort to bring back the ambiance of yesteryear, Providence is quickly becoming one of New England’s most popular cities because of its historical charm. This is the capital city of Rhode Isl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

It’s worthwhile to stop in Plymouth at the historical sites of Plymouth Rock, where the Pilgrims first landed and see the replica of Mayflower II, the ship that brought the Pilgrims to Plymouth in 1620, and Burial Hill, the graveyard where many of the first settlers are buried. It is inte... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Beyond Wiscasset, you are now in one of the most famous of all Maine regions—Boothbay Harbor. With a year-round population of only a couple of thousand, this is an area that can absorb the summer residents, the visitors staying the night, and those who will simply be passing through on th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

While in Acadia National Park be sure to find and follow Loop Road, the park’s main attraction, as it winds its way along the coast and up to Cadillac Mountain. There are many places to park, to gaze, to photograph, and to smell, and many birds to watch in this ever-changing landscape. Be sur... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

As you leave Camden, given an extra half hour and a beautiful day, we recommend you take a short detour that will reward you with some memorable views. Just on the northern outskirts of town watch for a left hand turn to Mount Battie and Camden Hills State Park. This road winds to the top of th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Glynn House Inn: Canterbury Shaker Village is a national historic landmark and museum in Canterbury, New Hampshire, with 25 restored and 4 reconstructed Shaker buildings. Its 694 acre site includes gardens, fields, ponds and forests. Known for its tranquil beauty, the village... more

  • Property Recommended

If you’ve spent the night in the Salem and Marblehead area, you’ll now be facing the choice of a second day on the North Shore or moving onward into Maine. I recommend that you drive to Gloucester to visit Beauport, the Cape Ann Historical Museum, and, if time permits, the Hammond C... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Sagamore Bridge spans the Cape Cod Canal, which is used by shipping and pleasure craft to avoid circumnavigating the entire Cape on journeys between Boston and the coasts of Rhode Island, Connecticut, and states to the south. This is your entrance onto Cape Cod with its scenic character and... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Leaving Sandwich, get onto Route 6A, the northern route along the upper coast of Cape Cod. It’s a delightful road to follow as it winds its way through the lovely, historical towns of Barnstable, Yarmouth Port, Dennis, and Brewster. These old seafaring communities with their lovely main s... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Many clipper ships were built in this port in the middle of the 19th century and here you find several examples of the vessels of that era. Of the three fully rigged sailing craft moored at the docks, particularly interesting—and open for tours—is the Charles W. Morgan, the last of ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Chestnut Street, Registered National Historic Landmark, is lined with mansions built by ship captains and merchants that reflect the wealth of that era and the shipping trade. The street is 80 feet wide which adds to the vision of grandeur these homes on this avenue that has been called "t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

For children, there are two museums of particular note: The Boston Museum of Science, located by the Charles River, offers an array of educational exhibits that invite active participation in the world of science and technology. (This museum is fascinating and I urge you to make time for it in ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Mall's 32 acres were designed in the French boulevard style by Arthur Gilman in 1856. Today, sweetgum, green ash, maple, linden, zelkova, Japanese pagoda and elm define this formal avenue, along with monuments decorating its expansive central promenade. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Concord Museum, in the town center, houses 19 galleries with furnishings of the revolutionary period and the century that followed. What is particularly interesting in this museum is that each room represents a different period. As you tour these various rooms, guides explain the evolving s... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you have time, a drive through the Connecticut River Valley is most relaxing. To reach the towns along the Connecticut River, take I-95 south to Route 9 north, and exit immediately for Essex. The valley has along its banks a number of lovely Colonial seafaring towns where white clapboard hom... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Copley Square is a public square which is located in the Back Bay of Boston.    It was named after John Singleton Copley which was an American Portraitist.  The name Copley Square is frequently applied to the larger area extending approximately two blocks east and west along... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If traveling on a Wednesday or Thursday between May and September, you would be well rewarded to detour out to The Great House on the 2,100-acre Crane Estate outside of Ipswich. Presiding over rolling hills, quiet woods, open meadows, salt marshes, and miles of sandy beach and estuary islands, ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you finish shopping in Freeport take a trip out to the Desert of Maine, a phenomenon of a former forest where the winds of time have laid bare more than 40 acres of sand, now formed into sand dunes—in an area nowhere near the sea. To reach and view this phenomenon (open from early May ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In Boston, you should not miss walking along the Freedom Trail in the heart of the city, marked by a red brick path in the pavement (this takes at least two hours). The trail leads to the sites where many of the history-making events that created the new country took place—be sure to incl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Rockland, with its almost 8,000 population, is the next town of size. It has all the hustle, bustle, and commercial activity of a modern seaport from which lobsters are shipped throughout the world. Here you find the Farnsworth Art Museum, which is almost a required stop because of its 19th- an... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Boston’s Financial District is centered around one of its major transportation hubs, South Station. Within a few blocks’ walk are the Aquarium, Chinatown, the theater district, and many shopping opportunities in the larger department stores.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Be sure to visit Essex and drive the broad tree-lined main streets of Lyme and Old Lyme. In fact a highlight in terms of sightseeing and well worth a visit is the Florence Griswold Museum, located in Old Lyme and considered by many to be the birthplace of American Impressionism. A prosperous sh... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A detour south from Newcastle to the tip of the peninsula will reward you with yet another charming fishing town, New Harbor with its colorful harbor and old fort, Fort William Henry Colonial Pemaquid, and Maine’s most photographed lighthouse at Pemaquid Point. Built in 1827 on a rocky le... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In Boston, you should not miss walking along the Freedom Trail in the heart of the city, marked by a red brick path in the pavement (this takes at least two hours). The trail leads to the sites where many of the history-making events that created the new country took place—be sure to incl... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Be sure to visit Gay Head with its clay cliffs, which have stood high above the sea for the last 100 million years—their colors and majesty are memorable. The Gay House lighthouse station dates back to 1799 and the current tower to 1856. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the town of East Haddam, during the months of April through December, the Goodspeed Opera House is the home of musicals being previewed for the legitimate theater and revivals of some of America’s most beloved plays.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Back on Route 9, you continue north a few miles to a barn on your left with a clock tower and a somewhat confusing sign on your right that points to the beach called Goose Rocks. With one tiny store, this beach is a magnificent 2-mile-long stretch of sand—a rarity on the rocky coast of Ma... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Old Bennington is a charming village dating back to the 18th century and steeped in Colonial history, which lies 9 miles to the west of the commercial town of Bennington on Route 9. Allow time for the walking tour (maps available at the Chamber of Commerce) including the Old First Church, the B... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

There are many other varied attractions for the visitor to Boston. More information can be obtained from the Greater Boston Convention and Visitors Bureau located at 2 Copley Place, Suite 105, at the intersection of Tremont and West Streets (1-888-SEE BOSTON, www.bostonusa.com).... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Green Mountains are home to some of New England’s oldest and most famous ski areas—many a youngster has learned ski technique here. Each mountain has its own distinctive style of skiing and skiers often will have their favorite. Studying the individual ski area descriptions of e... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you’ve spent the night in the Salem and Marblehead area, you’ll now be facing the choice of a second day on the North Shore or moving onward into Maine. I recommend that you drive to Gloucester to visit Beauport, the Cape Ann Historical Museum, and, if time permits, the Hammond C... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Charles Bullfinch, one of the principal architects of many of Boston’s historic buildings, completed the State House, with its golden dome, in 1786. Nearby, another example of his talent, the Harrison Gray Otis House, today serves as the headquarters of SPNEA (Society for the Preservation... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Harvard Museum of Natural History was established in 1998 as the public face of three research museums: the Museum of Comparative Zoology, the Harvard University Herbaria, and the Mineralogical and Geological Museum. The goal is to present incomparable collections of the parenting museums a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Across the river, neighboring Cambridge is home to Harvard University, Radcliffe College, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, three of the finest seats of higher learning in the world.. Around these academic communities has developed a maze of commercial and residential neighborhoods... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Harvard Yard is a grassy area of about 25 acres, adjacent to Harvard Square at Harvard University.  It is the oldest part and is in the center of the campus.  ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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