germany-bavaria

Mid Atlantic Cities


Albany, the state capital, sits on the Hudson River in central New York and was in its earliest years the gateway to western New York, traveling the Erie Canal to the Great Lakes. The Capitol Building looks for all the world like a château and the grand and large plazas in front of it ser... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alexandria, Virginia

Cross the Potomac from the nation’s capital of Washington D.C., for the short drive to the neighboring town of Alexandria. The boyhood home of Robert E. Lee is steeped in history and many of its 18th-century homes have been preserved. A walking tour of the town provides a glimpse into that ea... more

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Continuing along on Route 37 from Ogdensburg, then follow Route 12 to Alexandria Bay. The town was built out onto a promontory into the bay and is now the center of much of the area’s tourism. Boat tours depart from the town and while cruising the bay one can see many of the hom... more

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Route 50 leads north from Easton to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and west over to Annapolis, the state capital, also known as the site of the United States Naval Academy and as a major yachting center. Congress assembled here in 1783 and 1784, making it the first capital of the United States. Anna... more

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Within the Piedmont region is Appomattox, reached from the Blue Ridge Parkway by taking I-81 or Route 11 then Route 60 east to Route 24 south. Appomattox is the site of the famous Civil War battle where General Robert E. Lee became surrounded by the armies of the North and surrendered on behalf... more

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If traveling between May and November consider stopping at the Norman Rockwell Exhibit located on Route 7-A. A display of his artistry, particularly the work he completed while he lived here from 1939 to 1953 is on display in the former 19th century church.... more

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Eventually, after crossing the Mullico River, you will arrive in Atlantic City. If gambling, casino shows, and a 4-mile boardwalk are of interest, this may be a place to pause; otherwise, you have the option to bypass all this by staying on Route 9. (If you wish to access the coast from Philade... more

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You’ll want to allow time for a visit of Baltimore. This is a city whose resurgence is remarkable, with a downtown area and a waterfront that is nothing short of exciting. You should not miss a tour of the harbor (410-727-3113) and among other sights to see are the B&O Railroad Museum... more

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From Ocean City take Route 50 west and then turn south on Route 113, stopping first in Berlin, an interestingly restored town. A stop here provides the opportunity for some antiquing.... more

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In the village of Blue Mountain Lake, at the junction of Routes 28 and 30, is the Adirondacks Museum, a compound of buildings, galleries, and exhibit halls, which is thought of as the Smithsonian Museum of the Adirondacks. It is unfortunately open only from Memorial Day to mid-October but ... more

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Outside the usual tourist areas of interest, there are additional sights well worth time if that is available or if your interest is so sparked. These would include in the Bronx, the Bronx Zoo, the largest urban wildlife park in the United States (Bronx River Parkway at Fordham Road, 718-367-10... more

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The city of Buffalo, the second-largest city in the state and the center of business and the arts in western New York, is just south of Niagara Falls. Downtown Buffalo has many 19th- and 20th-century buildings built in the then-popular art deco style of architecture. On the 28th floor of the ci... more

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There is a series of towns at the northern tips of the lakes along Route 20 that are interesting to visit, including Canandaigua with the Sonnenburg Gardens and Museum (585-394-4922 weekdays, 585-393-9404 weekends) and the Granger Homestead and Carriage Museum, a showcase of the histo... more

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Soon you arrive in the granddaddy of all the summer shore communities, Cape May, now popular year-round. Difficult as it is to imagine, in the early 1800s holidaymakers came to Cape May to wade in the ocean waters in woolen clothing. By the middle of the 19th century Cape May had become the cou... more

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Home to the peace loving Quakers, Chadds Ford, was the site of one of the largest Revolutionary War battles where, in 1777,  29,000 British and Revolutionary troops faced-off.  The battle is best remembered as the Battle of Brandywine. Today, Chadds Ford is best known as the home... more

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Charlottesville, located just north of I-64, is where Thomas Jefferson built his home, Monticello. Touring Monticello is an opportunity to glimpse into Jefferson’s life and to understand the life and times of this American patriot (434-984-9800). Charlottesville is also the home of the Un... more

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Eleven miles farther on from Alexandria Bay, in the town of Clayton, is the Antique Boat Museum, in which are displayed some 150 of the freshwater boats that plied the waters of the area (315-686-4104).... more

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Nestled on the south tip of Lake Otsego, Cooperstown, equidistant between I-88 and Route 20, is best known as the home of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, whose three floors contain the history, memorabilia, data, and records of those who made this sport what it is today. There is a the... more

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After this visit to the western part of New York State take I-86 east to Corning. Be sure to plan a stop and tour of the Corning Museum of Glass. The primary reason for visiting the museum is to see the exhibits of glass spanning 3,500 years—these are extraordinary exhibits and one cannot... more

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A short side trip from Princess Anne to Crisfield (via Route 413) at the southwestern tip of Maryland brings you to a village of fishermen, their boats, and the ever-present seagulls. The primary activity here is fishing for oysters and crabs, both softshell (in the summer only) and hardshell&m... more

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The industrial city of Cumberland on the Potomac River, also dating back to the time of the French and Indian Wars, is home to many historic sites and the headquarters of the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. In the town of Grantsville as you wend your way west on I-68, you will notice the desc... more

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Southeast of Buffalo in East Aurora via Route 400 south is the Roycroft Campus and the Elbert Hubbard-Roycroft Museum, located on the former site of the manufacturers of furniture and accessories in the Arts and Crafts style.... more

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Easton, a college town (Lafayette College) is home to two of the more interesting venues in this book, the National Canal Museum and the Crayola Factory, located at the same location.... more

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Take Route 50 to the town of Easton, the commercial center for this part of Maryland. This is an attractive town and a good place to do some antiquing—while consuming more of the seafood of the Eastern Shore.... more

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From Washington, D.C. drive northwest on I-270 into the area where much of our country’s history was told on bloody battlefields and over long winters. Plan to stop in Frederick (from the 270 take I-70 east for 3 miles), an historic town with lovely old stone structures.... more

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In Garrison-on-Hudson there is an example of the finest of American Federal architecture, interiors, and furniture—Boscobel, whose contents have been meticulously assembled to show the influence of the period of the Adam style. Of particular note is the freestanding stairway in the front ... more

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In Geneva take a moment to visit Rosa Hill Mansion, a Greek Revival mansion built in 1839 (315-789-3848).... more

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Home to Georgetown University, exploration of Georgetown with its picturesque residential streets, fabulous shops, and plethora of inviting restaurants is a must. Enchanting and charming, Georgetown has a character all its own—it is almost like a village within the big city. Walk along M ... more

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Gettysburg is famous for its battlefields and place in history. Those interested in the Civil War will want to include it in a trip in this part of Pennsylvania. To visit Gettysburg and to gain an understanding of the Civil War you will need to plan a minimum of one day in this area. Gettysburg... more

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. In the town of Grantsville as you wend your way west on I-68, you will notice the descendants of the Amish and the Mennonite farmers who today live their lives as their ancestors did for the last century or more. Of special beauty is the area not far to the south around Deep Creek Lake.... more

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Harrisburg is the state capital of Pennsylvania. The capitol building, an Italian Renaissance structure dedicated in 1906 by President Teddy Roosevelt, is worthy of a visit and a guided tour. (717-787-6810) The State Museum of Pennsylvania, 3rd and North Streets, houses and features the arts an... more

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Welcome to the town of Hershey, the city of chocolate, with the Milton S. Hershey Museum, Hershey’s Chocolate World, and Hershey Gardens. If chocolate is a passion of yours, then you will enjoy the tourism that has grown with the success of Milton S. Hershey, the creator of the chocolate ... more

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From Corning, the quickest way to reach Albany is to travel to Binghamton and pick up the I-88 from there. However, you may want to detour northeast on Route 13 to Ithaca, site of Cornell University, founded in 1886, which sits high above the town. Cornell has tours of its campus, best done by ... more

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From Chautauqua, cross the lake at Stow and travel east to Jamestown. Set on the river just inland from the lake’s eastern shore, Jamestown was Lucille Ball’s childhood home and there is a museum, the Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Center (716-484-0800) that serves as a tribute to the firs... more

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Referred to as Virginia’s Historic Triangle are the colonial towns of Yorktown, Williamsburg and Jamestown. An interesting way to begin to understand the history of this area is to visit these three significant towns, all part of the Colonial National Historical Park, located on a peninsu... more

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Entrance to the Catskills, an area of great beauty, is through the town of Kingston, which sits on the west bank at the edge of the Hudson River and the Catskills. With the town dating back to the 17th century, there is much to be enjoyed in strolling through the historic district—many of... more

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In the early 1930s the Adirondacks became famous when Lake Placid, reached by taking Route 73 from I-87 north (the New York State Thruway), hosted the Winter Olympics, as it did again in 1980. The Olympic Stadium, with its four ice-skating rinks, is available for touring by appointment (518-523... more

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The city of Lancaster is the seat of Lancaster County and is worth a visit for its historical buildings and the central market. Guided walking tours lasting 90 minutes are available. Five miles south of downtown Lancaster off Route 222 an interesting visit may be made to the Hans Herr House at ... more

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An interesting side trip from Ocean City is to drive 30 miles north on Routes 528 and 1, bringing you into Delaware and the towns of Dewey Beach, Rehoboth Beach, and Lewes—Lewes with its shops and restaurants is particularly charming. A car ferry connects Lewes with the lowest tip of New ... more

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An alternative drive south is along Route 11, which parallels I-81, passing through many historical towns with lots of buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. All the commercial activity in each of the towns is on this route, including a large number of antique shops. Among the t... more

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Merion, only five miles from the center of Philadelphia, is home to the Barnes Foundation, a museum famous for its Impressionist and Post-impressionist collection.... more

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To the west of the suburbs of Washington on Route 50 is Middleburg, a town whose surrounding countryside is known as “horse country.” Mile upon mile of white fences separate green pastures smelling of freshly mown grass where horses graze, and one can only imagine the gracious farmh... more

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The drive west on Route 50 is particularly lovely since the countryside is so beautiful—there are no fast-food establishments or other highway detractions from your enjoyment of this part of northern Virginia. Of particular note for lovers of antiques is the town of Millwood where there a... more

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Spend a day meandering pleasurably through Doylestown and New Hope with time for antiquing, for a leisurely lunch, and perhaps for attending a performance at the Bucks County Playhouse in New Hope.... more

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If antiquing is a passion, visit New Market, a few miles farther east of Frederick, generally considered to be the capital for antiquing in Maryland. Keep an eye out for the numerous vineyards that lie in this area and the tasting rooms where you can stop and taste the latest creations of the l... more

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So very different from the eastern part of the state is its rural western fringe with its important farming industry. There are many small towns in this area, interconnecting with one another on winding roads that force the traveler to slow down and enjoy the region. Most of the visitors coming... more

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Turning east from Salisbury, travel toward the Atlantic-coast beaches on Route 50 and to the major Maryland beach resort of Ocean City. Once upon a time Ocean City was known for its boardwalk, tourist attractions, and hotels whose residents were escaping from the sweltering heat and humidity in... more

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Ogdensburg was the birthplace of famed artist Frederic Remington and is home to a museum named for him. The museum showcases his paintings and sculpures.... more

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Take Route 333 west to Oxford and allow time to walk the streets of this town, located at the tip of a peninsula between the Tred Avon and Choptank Rivers. See the fishing and the boat-building industry that flourishes here. For an interesting change of pace take the Oxford-Bellevue ferry to sh... more

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Sometimes called the “Cradle of Liberty” and often referred to as the “City of Brotherly Love,” Philadelphia is where the United States of America was born on July 4, 1776 with the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. This is also where the Constitution of the Un... more

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