germany-bavaria

Mexico Attractions


The Palacio de Bellas Artes is in the heart of Mexico City, bordering onto Alameda Central, a delightful park with many shaded paths and pretty bubbling fountains. In Aztec times this was a busy marketplace and still today there are many vendors selling their wares. The Palacio de Bellas Artes,... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Just beyond the Plaza Villabongin, you see one of the symbols of Morelia, its aqueduct, built in the late 1700s to supply water from nearby springs for the growing city. It stretches for an impressive 2 kilometers and has over 250 dramatic high arches in excellent condition, which, when softly ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

At the height of its glory Kabah was one of the largest cities in northern Yucatán. At the entrance to the ceremonial city are the ruins of an arch that marked the start of the great Mayan road connecting Kabah to Uxmal. The Arco Monumental (Monumental Arch) is  intricately d... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Local tours are available from the town of San Carlos on the edge of Bahía Magdalena.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Palacio de Bellas Artes is in the heart of Mexico City, bordering onto Alameda Central, a delightful park with many shaded paths and pretty bubbling fountains. In Aztec times this was a busy marketplace and still today there are many vendors selling their wares. The Palacio de Bellas Artes,... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

If you like to shop, visit the Barrio de Los Artistas, located at 6 Norte, between 6 and 8 Oriente. This is an upscale, fun place to browse and poke around small shops laden with crafts and art. There are also many small stalls selling really nice-quality goods. Many artists have studios here a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Another of Don Vasco’s dreams was to build an extraordinary cathedral, which he designed to be three times larger than the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris. With that in mind, he built the Basilica de Nuestra Señora de La Salud on a gentle hill about two blocks from the plaza. Only... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Basilica de Nuestra Señora de La Soledad (Church of the Virgin of Solitude) is a beautiful 16th-century church, whose ornate façade is studded with statues. The church is most famous for its shrine containing Oaxaca’s patron saint, the Virgin of Solitude. This statue ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Visit the 17th-century Basilica of Our Lady of Guanajuato, located on the Plaza de La Paz. Here you find a wooden statue of the Virgin Mary, covered with jewels, that supposedly dates back to 714. King Philip II of Spain sent it to the church as a gift in 1557. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

IMG_3742_MAIN_Photo1.jpg

Dotting the stretch of highway between Escárcega and Chetumal is a group of fabulous Mayan ruins in an area called Río Bec. These are some of our favorite archaeological sites in Mexico—not only because they have awesome structures, but also because you are frequently the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Biblioteca Publica is a library in a beautiful Colonial building that houses Mexico’s second-largest English library.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

(Chapultepec Park) Although Emperor Maximilian ruled Mexico for only a brief period, he left a French influence upon the city, including wide, tree-lined boulevards. One of the finest of these is the Paseo de La Reforma, a 12-kilometer-long thoroughfare, which remains as one of the most importa... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

IMG_3739_MAIN_Photo1.jpg

Dotting the stretch of highway between Escárcega and Chetumal is a group of fabulous Mayan ruins in an area called Río Bec. These are some of our favorite archaeological sites in Mexico—not only because they have awesome structures, but also because you are frequently the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Go under the aqueduct and continue ahead on La Calzada Frey Antonio de San Miguel. The street was named by Father Antonio de San Miguel who commissioned the aqueduct to be built. This pedestrian esplanade is lined by beautiful 18th-century mansions, which during its heyday housed Morelia&r... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Casa de Ignacio Allende  is a mid-18th-century home which was the birthplace of Captain Ignacio Allende, famed hero of the War of Independence. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

This is the home where one of Mexico’s most famous leaders, Benito Juárez, lived as a servant during his youth and the furnishings reflect the style of that period (early 19th century). Benito Juárez, a Zapotec Indian born in the nearby village of San Pablo Guelato, was ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Before leaving Querétaro, if the timing is right, have lunch in the courtyard of La Casa de La Marquesa—the food is excellent and the ambiance is charming.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Its largest and oldest park, the Parque Agua Azul, not only has Casa de Las Artesanias where some of the best handicraft items made in the state are displayed and sold. There is always something going on here—concerts, outdoor theater, festivals, etc.—and it’s a great place fo... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Not attributed to Don Vasco, but certainly a place you won’t want to miss, especially if you are into shopping for crafts, is the Casa de Los Once Patios (House of the Eleven Patios), a 17th-century Dominican monastery just a half block off the Don Vasco de Quiroga Plaza. The original bui... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Make it a day’s outing and enjoy a delicious lunch in the lovely garden courtyard of the appealing Casa Montana, which is also a delightful small hotel. Your hostess Susan Montana (a transplant from New Mexico), will be glad to share her love of the town and advise you what sights to see.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A wonderful excursion from Palenque is a visit to the Casacadas de Agua Azul (Waterfalls at Agua Azul). When planning your day you might want to consider an early start and perhaps ask the hotel where you are staying to pack you a lunch and plan to have picnic here (there are also many open-a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the summit of the highest hill in Chapultepec Park you find the Castillo de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Castle) whose story is rarely reported in American history books. The castle was once the home of Emperor Maxmilian and his wife Carlota and still has furnishings from the era of their reign.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Our Lady of the Assumption Cathedral, perched on a hill just a short walk from the Plaza de La Constitución, was the first permanent Catholic church in the Americas. Leaving the southeast corner of the plaza, go through the small square and take the pretty, cobblestone pathway lined by t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Dating back to 1562 and considered by some to be one of Mexico’s most splendid cathedrals, the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is tremendously imposing with its twin bell towers, massive doorway, and intricately carved façade. The interior is opulent, with soaring vaulted ce... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

La Catedral: The cathedral, dating back to 1528, is tucked on the northwest corner of the Plaza Principal in San Cristóbal De Las Casas. Father Bartolomé de Las Casas, for whom the city was named, was the church’s first bishop. The exterior is brilliantly painted in bright... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The second place you must include is a visit to Mexico City’s fabulous zócalo (main square). This in an incredible, huge plaza capturing the magic of Mexico’s past and present. It is surrounded by handsome Colonial buildings and dominated on one side by a superb cathedral, al... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The core of old Guadalajara stretches for seven blocks and is laid out like a cross. At its western end is the Plaza Guadalajara, dominated by a stunning cathedral; at the southern end of the cross is the Plaza de Armas, enhanced by a park with a lacy wrought-iron bandstand where concerts are p... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

A convenient spot to start your explorations of Morelia is on the (above-mentioned) Avenida Francisco Madero at the Plaza de Armas, nicknamed Plaza de Los Mártires (Square of the Martyrs), in honor of two leaders of the Revolution of Independence who were executed here. This is an e... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cuernavaca’s cathedral is within a walled complex of churches that includes not only the 16th-century cathedral, but also the 18th-century Templo de La Tercera Orden de San Francisco and, the 19th-century Capilla del Carmen... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cenote de Los Sacrificios (Cenote of the Sacrifices): This natural well, reached by a path through the jungle from the central plaza, served not only as a water source for the city but also as a place where offerings were made to the gods. Over the years, a number of archaeological ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The surface of the land in this part of the Yucatán Peninsula that lies in the state of Quintana Roo is basically a limestone shelf, beneath which flows a network of underground rivers. Occasionally the limestone collapses, exposing the water below and forming natural wells, which the... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Centro Cultural Ignacio Ramirez is an art institute built within a former convent which has one of the largest interior courtyards found anywhere in the New World... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

While in Zacatecas, take the teleférico (cable car), which glides over the city to the Cerro de La Bufa, the hilltop that was the site of Pancho Villa’s most famous battle. There are monuments on the hill commemorating this event. Also on the summit is a beautiful church. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the summit of the highest hill in Chapultepec Park you find the Castillo de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Castle) whose story is rarely reported in American history books. The castle was once the home of Emperor Maxmilian and his wife Carlota and still has furnishings from the era of their reig... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

IMG_3741_MAIN_Photo1.jpg

Dotting the stretch of highway between Escárcega and Chetumal is a group of fabulous Mayan ruins in an area called Río Bec. These are some of our favorite archaeological sites in Mexico—not only because they have awesome structures, but also because you are frequently the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

IMG_3679_MAIN_Photo1.jpg

Chichén Itzá is one of the Yucatán’s most popular archaeological sites and attracts hordes of tourists. Being so conveniently close, you can be the first one at the gate in the morning and be able to enjoy the site at its finest in the cool of the morning when the s... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Copper Canyon is so remote that for many years it was inaccessible to tourists. Only a few rugged individuals made their way by foot or on horseback to enjoy the spectacle of this masterpiece of nature. The situation changed dramatically in 1961 when the Chihuahua al Pacífico Railr... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Church of Zihacantán: You will see when you visit the Church of this small village that the worshipers sit on chairs and the mens’ garb is exceptionally colorful with brilliantly embroidered vests. The pagan beliefs of the indigenous people creep into their religious ceremon... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Puerto Vallarta has a scenic location on the sea with the Sierra Madre foothills behind it, and the ornate crown of the Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe serving as a photogenic landmark. It is a quaint, picturesque town with cobblestone streets, Colonial buildings, traditional Spanish ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The enormously wealthy Count of Valenciana, owner of the mine that bears his name, spared no expense when he built the dazzling Church of San Cayetano, lavishly embellished with gold. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Overlooking Jardín Union is the 17th-century Church of San Diego, a splendid church with an ornate doorway. Originally part of a Jesuit seminary, the Templo de La Compañia de Jesus is quite impressive, with a dramatic dome that looks like that of St. Peter’s in Rome. Gu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

San Juan Chamula: The main sight in San Juan Chamula is its church, dedicated to St. John the Baptist. Here, in a simple white church with turquoise-colored trim, you find the pagan beliefs of the indigenous Mayan people intermingled with the Catholic faith. You step into the dimly lit church... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The large ruined city of Cobá lies about halfway between Tulum and Cancún, and is situated 40 kilometers inland from the coast at the end of a good road. It is built around a group of five small lakes that once provided water for a region of perhaps 50,000 people. The presenc... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Mexico’s well known Copper Canyon (Barranca del Cobre) boasts statistics more impressive than the Grand Canyon in the United States. The Copper Canyon is deeper and, if you include the six canyons that make up the whole, covers more than four times the area. However, in our estima... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Costa Alegre, considered one of Mexico’s greatest undiscovered treasures, is becoming a favored hideaway both for celebrities and the wealthy seeking seclusion in a natural paradise. Alternatively referred to as Costa Alegre (Happy Coast) or Costa Careyes (Turtle Coast) after the many... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cuadrángle de Las Monjas (Quadrangle of the Nuns): Just beyond the Pyramid of the Soothsayer in the ruined city of Uxmal is a broad courtyard surrounded on four sides by large, richly embellished buildings. This large quadrangle reminded the Spaniards of the cloisters of a nunnery... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Dotting the stretch of highway between Escárcega and Chetumal is a group of fabulous Mayan ruins in an area called Río Bec. These are some of our favorite archaeological sites in Mexico—not only because they have awesome structures, but also because you are frequently the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The first major flourishing of the magnificent Mayan city of Edzná occurred during the late Pre-Classic period (450 B.C.–A.D. 300). Long before the other Puuc sites were established, this city was home to a large population that tilled the fertile soils of the valley. Its resurge... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Take a boat trip to the southern tip of the Baja Peninsula, where the Pacific and the Sea of Cortez meet. Towering granite monoliths lie along the coast, including the most dramatic and famous, El Arco, a rock arch that has been carved by the waves over millions of years. The Arch is a marine r... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

El Caracol (The Snail): Located a bit away from the central plaza and reached by a ten-minute stroll, is a second set of buildings. Be sure not to miss the path, as here you find one of Chichén Itzá’s highlights: a fascinating, very unusual domed structure that was ob... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

<< Next page of results (Page 1 of 4 )