germany-bavaria

Italy Attractions


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Abbazia di Monte Oliveto Maggiore was founded in the early 14th century by wealthy merchants from Siena as a Benedictine retreat, this fascinating abbey is well worth a detour. Be prepared to walk since you must park your car and follow a long path through the forest to the abbey’s entrance, ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Farfa in Sabine Hills, Italy

Not to be missed is the Abbey of Farfa, one of the most famous European religious buildings of the Middle Ages, found in the town of the same name. Charlemagne was its protector, and at the height of his empire, a vast part of central Italy was owned by the abbey. A visit is not complete withou... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Sheldon Wood

The Abbey is clearly marked about midway through the town of Cassino. The abbey, founded by St. Benedict in 529 A.D., is extremely interesting both religiously and historically. For war historians it brings back many battle memories—this is where the Germans staunchly held out against the... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Sergio Presbitero

Abbey Sant’Antimo is a superb romanesque abbey whose origins date back to the 9th century when it was founded as a Benedictine monastery. The abbey—a simple, pastel-pinkish stone church serenely set amongst fields of olive trees—makes a beautiful picture. Try to arrive at 11 am or 2:45 pm... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Flavio Sartoni

Should you want to time your stop in Bergamo for lunch, there are several excellent restaurants. One suggestion would be the Agnello d’Oro.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Villa Poggiano - Facade

Recommended by Cavallino d’Oro: The Alpe di Siusi and the Sciliar with their unmistakable profiles are often found in old legends about witches and magic. And magic still is alive! The Sciliar, South Tyrol’s landmark, dominates the highest mountain plateau in Europe: unmistakable, uniqu... more

  • Property Recommended

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The Amalfi Coast, the strip of coast that runs south from Sorrento to Salerno, is world famous for its beauty. A two lane road hugs the steep, winding coastline, capturing breathtaking views as the bluffs fold around the brilliant blue Mediterranean. Enchanting villages dot the coast, further e... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

scenery amalfi drive

Leaving Pompeii, head to the coast in the direction of Sorrento where the Amalfi Drive begins, tracing one of the most beautiful stretches of shoreline in the world. Be sure to make the journey in daylight because you want to savor every magnificent vista as well as safely negotiate this extrem... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Matt Perreault

In the Archaeological Park at the edge of Siracusa are two theaters—a 6th-century B.C. Greek Theater (one of the most magnificently preserved in the world) and the ruins of a 2nd-century A.D. Roman Amphitheater (one of the largest arenas the Romans ever built). ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Jindrich Shejbal

For sightseeing, there really isn’t much to see except the Badia a Passignano Abbey, founded by Benedictine monks in the 11th century. The abbey is set in a pocket of lush landscape and dominates the village, which is no more than a cluster of houses and a restaurant. However, as you driv... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Your target is the Piazza del Duomo, a huge square studded by fabulous buildings, including Pisa’s landmark, its Leaning Tower. However, it is not only the Leaning Tower that makes the Piazza del Duomo such a winner, it is studded with many other magnificent buildings, all of which are ou... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Jim deStefano

Another nearby museum is the Baptistry, a small museum that, as its name implies, houses the baptismal font for the Duomo. In addition to its beautifully frescoed walls and vaulted ceiling, of prime interest is the 15th-century baptismal font, which is adorned by religious scenes cast in bronze... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Shari Henson

The Bapistry has beautiful mosaics and its bronze doors by Ghiberti were said by Michelangelo to be worthy of serving as the gates to paradise. The main door shows scenes from the life of John the Baptist, the north door shows the life of Jesus, and the east door shows stories from the prophets... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The Basilica is like a museum. Not only is the structure magnificent, but the vast collection of works of art inside are almost unbelievable: imagine gazing at such masterpieces as the Pietà (the ethereal sculpture of Mary holding Jesus in her arms after the crucifixion, carved by Michel... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Anna Fox

Of course, you must savor the incomparable ambiance of Piazza San Marco (St. Mark’s Square). Late afternoon is especially romantic as music wafts across the enormous square, courtesy of the tiny orchestras entertaining visitors as they enjoy an aperitif. A colonnaded walkway encloses the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Recommended by Villa Paggi Country House: The "Basilica dei Fieschi" is located in San Salvatore (S. Savior) di Cogorno province of Genova. The building was started by Sinibaldo Fieschi, who became Pope Innocenzo IV in 1244, and finished by Ottobono Fieschi, Pope Adriano V in 1276. The fami... more

  • Property Recommended

Cynthia Sauvage

Capri has many wonders. The most famous is its submerged cave, the Blue Grotto, which can be accessed by boat when the seas are calm. Large boats begin leaving the harbor every day at 9 am for the short ride to the entrance to the grotto, where you are transferred into tiny rowboats. The earlie... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Curtis Townson

Maggiore offers ferries to many of its quaint towns and adds a special treat, the Borromean Islands, a small archipelago of three small islands, Isola Bella, Isola Madre, and Isola dei Pescatori. These enchanting islands can be reached by ferry from Stresa, Baveno, or Pallanza, but the m... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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A favorite pastime in Venice is wandering—just anywhere—exploring the maze of twisting canals and crisscrossing back and forth over some of the 400 whimsical bridges. One of the most famous, the Rialto Bridge, arching high over the canal, is especially colorful because it is lined b... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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There is no better way to get into the mood of Venice than to join the crowd at St. Mark’s pier as they climb aboard one of the ferries that ply the city’s waterways. It is a real bargain to board the vaporetto and enjoy the many wonderful palaces bordering the Grand Canal. In addit... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Antonio Cerri

Next to the church rises the 99-meter-tall Campanile di San Marco(bell tower) where in the 15th century priests were suspended in a cage to repent their sins. If you are in the plaza on the hour, watch the two Moors strike the hour with their huge bronze hammers as they have for 500 years. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

John S Y Lee

A beautiful twenty minute walk from the Piazza Umberto is to the Cannone Belvedere. This path guides you near delightful private villas hidden behind high walls (you get glimpses through the gates) and on to a promontory overlooking the sea. The French placed the cannone on the bluffs in 1808 t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Within Montepulciano there are many boutiques, restaurants, and cantinas selling wine. Our favorite wine shop here is an extremely special one, the very old Cantina del Redi, located just down the street from the Piazza Grande with its entrance next to the Palazzo Ricco. Once you enter, an anci... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Perched on Capodimonte Hill, which rises above the city, is a splendid park with over 4,000 varieties of centuries-old trees. Within these grounds is the Palazzo Capodimonte, built in 1738 as a hunting lodge for the King Charles III. Housed within the palace is the Museo e Gallerie Nazionale di... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Re-created from the ruins of Pompeii the Casa del Fauno is a fine example of how the wealthy lived prior to the eruption of Mount Vesuvius. The villa has several dining rooms and two inner courtyards.. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Maria Rosaria

Another of the re-created Pompeii buildings, the Casa del Poeta Tragico(House of the Tragic Poet), a more modest home then the Casa del Fauno, has a sign in mosaic saying “Cave Canem” (beware of the dog). . ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Follow your map to 21 Via Cappello and here you will find the 13th-century Casa di Giulietta and the balcony where Juliet rendezvoused with Romeo.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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From the center of Terni take route 79 to Marmore, a tiny village where Cascata delle Marmore is located. If you are a nature lover, you will not want to miss this side trip to the highest waterfall in Europe, which was created in 290 B.C. when the Romans changed the course of the River Velino... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Marco Marescotti

On the same day that you explore the coastal villages, include a visit to the 13th-century Castel del Monte. Built by Emperor Frederick II of Swab, it is somewhat of a mystery, having none of the fortifications usually associated with a medieval castle. Nevertheless, it is dramatic—a huge... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

c&r dunn

Castel dell’Ovo: Leaving the Piazza Plebiscito, head down to the waterfront and turn right, following the Via Nazario Sauro as it traces the waterfront. As it rounds a bend, the name of the boulevard changes to Via Partenope, which is fronted by deluxe hotels that face onto Santa Lucia Ha... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Just to the east of the Palazzo Reale, the Castel Nuovo rises on a bluff above the Porto Beverello, the dock from which the ferries leave for Capri and Sorrento. The Castel Nuovo (New Castle) certainly isn’t very new—it dates back to the 13th century. The building is definitely dram... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Luigi Prearo

The Castelvecchio (Old Castle) built by Congrande II of the Della Scala family in the 14th century, houses an art museum with paintings, sculptures, jewelry, and armaments. The 14th-century Ponte Scaligero (Scaliger Bridge) links the Castelvecchio with the opposite side of the river. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Castello d'Albola, Radda in Chianti, Tuscany, Italy

Castello d’Albola: The Castello d’Albola, a spectacular property just a short drive north of Radda on a gentle hill laced with grapes, is owned by the Zonin family, who have restored the entire medieval complex beautifully. This is an intimate, extremely pretty place to taste wines and take... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Ian Pletcher

 Castello di Brolio: If you visit only one winery, Castello di Brolio should be it since this is not only one of the oldest wineries the world, but also where Chianti wine was “born.” Although the production of wine in Tuscany dates back to Etruscan times, the enormously wealth... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Andrea Redi

Another favorite destination for wine- tasting is the beautiful Castello di Meleto, which has an idyllic setting in the gentle hills near the town of Gaiole. Just across from the dramatic castle you find a pretty winetasting room and gift shop where fine wines and olive oils produced on the est... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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From Varenna sightseeing visits are possible to the both Villa Cipressi and the 13th-century Castello di Vezio. Varenna is a main hub for ferries, including car ferries that shuttle back and forth from Varenna to Bellagio and Menaggio, enabling you to quickly cross the lake without having to dr... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Marco Farolfi

Castello di Volpaia: The 12th-century Castello di Volpaia, located on a narrow lane about 7 kilometers north of Radda, is one of our favorite places for winetasting. Plan to spend a day on this outing, with ample time to meander through the countryside en route, tour the winery, taste the super... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The Cathedral, dating from the 12th century, is well worth a visit to see its fine red marble columns and richly adorned interior.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The 12th-century Cathedral in Spoleto is so lovely that it alone would make a stop in this charming town worth a detour. The exterior of this very old cathedral, with its beautiful rose window and intricate mosaics, is truly charming. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Duomo di San Gennaro constructed on the historic site of a previous cathedral, which dates back to 570 AD (the Cattedrale Stefania), the Duomo di San Gennaro (San Gennaro Cathedral) is located next to the Basilica di Santa Restituta, which was constructed in Naples during the 4th century... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Recommended by Eremo della Giubiliana: Built after the earthquake of 1693, the Cathedral of San Giorgio was built in the baroque style of the time. It is a fine example of the architecture and well worth a visit.... more

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It was in Radda in 1924 that 33 producers gathered to create a consortium to protect a very special blend of wine that was known as Chianti Classico. Only vintners who maintain the standards of the consortium are allowed to proudly display its symbol of the black rooster... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

vtveen

The lower part of Bergamo is modern and a bit dreary, but the old medieval city snuggled on the top of the hill holds such treasures as the Piazza Vecchia the Church of St. Mary Major.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The remote coast of the Cinque Terre has not yet fallen prey to a great influx of tourists. As you follow the highway up the coast, it becomes a masterpiece of engineering—bridging deep ravines and tunneling in and out of the cliffs, which rise steeply from the sea. Along the way you pass... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

John Haslam

A company called Circumvesuviana has narrow-gauge trains leaving Naples’ Central Station about every half hour, arriving at the Pompeii Villa dei Misteri station (located across from the entrance to the site) about 40 minutes later. At the entrance to Pompeii, we suggest either buying a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Coastal Villages: Be sure to include in your sightseeing some of the characterful towns along the coast. They look entirely different from the colorful fishing villages in the north of Italy. These are Moorish-looking, with stark-white houses lining narrow, alley-like streets. The Adriatic look... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

David Spender

The lower part of Bergamo is modern and a bit dreary, but the old medieval city snuggled on the top of the hill holds such treasures as the Piazza Vecchia, the Colleoni Chapel, and the Church of St. Mary Major.Opening times:From March to October: everyday, 9a.m-12.30a.m; 2:00p.m – 6.30p.m... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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You must see the gigantic Colosseum, the entertainment center for the citizens of ancient Rome. Here 50,000 people gathered to be entertained by flamboyant spectacles that included gladiatorial contests, races, games, and contests where Christian martyrs fought against wild beasts.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Another of our favorite wineries, Dei, is just a few kilometers outside Montepulciano’s city walls. What is especially fun about this winery is that it is family-owned and managed by the lovely daughter, Maria Caterina Dei, who still lives in the beautiful family villa on the property. Ma... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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From Asolo, you head north to one of the most stunning regions of Italy, the Dolomites—breath-taking mountains. It is important to have a very detailed map of the region because this is a confusing area for driving. Adding to the confusion of finding your way is the fact that most of the ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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