germany-bavaria

France Attractions


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Bayeux was the first French town to be liberated. On the main ring road around the old town is the 1944 Battle of Normandy Museum with its exhibitions of tanks, guns, and armored vehicles used in the battle. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Hautvillers is one of the prettiest of Champagne’s villages. It was in the village basilica that Dom Perignon performed his miracle and discovered how to make still wine sparkling by the méthode champenoise. The abbey is now owned by Möet et Chandon and contains a private mu... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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In the vicinity of Chablis is the memorable Abbaye de Fontenay that was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO in 1981. L’Abbaye de Fontenay. Set against a backdrop of forest, this beautiful abbaye, its fountains and gardens will prove a highlight of your trip. (Open all year). Founded in 1... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The skyline of Arles can be seen as you approach the city. Abounding in character, this is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. On the outskirts of the city, surrounded by fields, stand the ruins of Abbaye de Montmajour, which was built in the 10th... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Just four kilometers from the ever popular town of Gordes is Senanque and the Abbaye. Detour to Senanque to visit its 12th-century Cistercian abbey which stands dramatically isolated at the edge of the mountainside surrounded by lavender and oak trees. Vacated by the monks in 1869 and accessi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cluny and its famous Benedictine abbey, Saint-Pierre and Saint-Paul was founded in 910. Its abbots were considered as powerful and influencial as the kings or pope for the role they played in the ecclesiastical reform movement that reached to over 2000 monasteries throughout Western Europe. The... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Conques is a tiny medieval town on a dramatic hillside site. Tucked a considerable distance off the beaten track, it is a delightful, unspoiled village that was once an important pilgrimage stop on the way to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Conques’s pride is its 11th-century Abbaye S... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Maison De La Porte Fortifiee: Flaran Abbey was a former Cistercian abbey located in Valence-sur-Baïse, in the départment of Gers, Southwest of France. The abbey was founded by Burgundian monks in 1151, as a daughter house of Escaladieu Abbey, at the confluence of the Auloue... more

  • Property Recommended

The picturesque village of Flavigny sur Ozerain, whose most recent fame is due to the fact it was used as the stage set for the film Chocolat, is charming. With its ancient narrow streets, fortified gates and religious and architectural heritage this is a wonderful old city to explore on foot.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Domaine a Marmande: "Aquensis, la cité des Eaux" offers 3,000 m2 completely dedicated to well-being and to the various pleasures of thermal springs. The history of Bagnères-de Bigorre is summarized by its former name, "VICUS AQUENSIS", given by the Romans who already knew h... more

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Recommended by Chateau de I’Isle-Marie: A must see on the D-Day itinerary, located opposite the famous bell tower from which paratrooper John Steele hung on the night of June 6, 1944. The museum is dedicated to the American Parachutists that landed in Sainte Mere Eglise, Normandy on the n... more

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Kaysersberg rivals its neighbors as being one of the most appealing towns in Alsace. Vineyards tumble down to the town from its ancient keep and 16th-century houses line narrow roads along the rushing River Weiss. Albert Schweitzer was born here and his house is open as a small museum. (Open Ma... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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The road travels inland from the water’s edge from Port en Bessin to Colleville sur Mer, where a road takes you out to the American Cemetery and an expansive 170-acre plot overlooking Omaha Beach. A dignified tribute to those who gave their lives in battle, 9,387 white crosses stand in ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Angers was the former capital of the Dukes of Anjou and is now a city full of factories with an old town and its 13th-century fortress at its heart. During the 16th century many of the 17 massive towers were dismantled, on royal command, to the level of the wall-walk. The castle has some specta... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Saint Rémy de Provence, a pretty, sleepy town, nestled in the shade of its plane trees. Of interest in the town are a Romanesque church, Renaissance houses, and a busy public square. On its outskirts, following the D5 south in the direction of Les Baux de Provence, is the Clinique de Sai... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cahors is an enchanting city settled on the banks of the River Lot and boasts a number of architectural riches. The Arc de Diane is a remnant of a vast Gallo-Roman thermal establishment. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc was commissioned by Napoleon in 1806 to commemorate his victory in Austerlitz but was not officially completed until 1836.  The Arc is home to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and is one of the most visited monuments in Paris.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theaters in the... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arles, abounding in character, is a truly lovely city whose growth is governed by the banks and curves of the Rhône. It has fierce ties to its Roman past when it thrived as a strong port city and gateway. Arles is glorified because of its magnificent Gallo-Roman arenas and theaters in the hear... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

You can visit Arnaga, Edmond Rostand’s magnificent château-home and gardens located in the town of Cambo les Bains. Now a national monument, it is also a museum dedicated to this much-celebrated author of Cyrano de Bergerac. (Open Apr to Nov, tel: 05.59.29.70.25.) Cambo les Bains, with its ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Arromanches is a lively seaside town whose broad crescent of golden sand was one of the D-Day landing beaches dominated by the British troops. In June, 1944 a huge floating harbor was erected in a gigantic U in the bay. Designed by British engineers, the harbor was comprised of massive concrete... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Assemblee Nationale

The Assemblee Nationale, lower house of Parliament of France, is open to the public: 9h - 11h, 14h - 16h, Saturdays when in session 9h - 11h, 14h - 17h, Monday - Saturday when out of session (until 16h on Saturdays) .... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the outskirts of the pretty little market town of Saint Céré whose square comes alive and is particularly colorful when the commodity for sale is livestock in the village of Le Tours de Saint Laurent is a tapestry museum the Atelier Musée Jean Lurçat. (Open mid-Jul to Oct, telephone n... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix is an enchanting, beautiful and aristocratic city to explore. The beckoning cobblestoned streets of its Old Quarter are intriguing to wander along at night and the illuminated tree-lined Cours Mirabeau is enchanting—a bit reminiscent of Paris with its many sidewalk cafés. Aix i... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

When traveling the Gorges du Verdon, on the northern outskirts of Trigance is a spectacular vista of the dramatic Verdon at the Balcons de la Mescla. You can pull off here, and there are terraced points from which you can look down at the dramatic loop in the path of the river some 760 meters ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Vézelay is a magical pilgrimage site. Sitting high on its hilltop above the surrounding countryside and for many people the highlight of a visit to Burgundy, this little town of Vézelay is full of narrow streets lined with old houses with sculptured doorways and mullioned windows ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The regional capital, Bayonne, has played an important role in history as a strategic commercial port city located at the junction of two rivers, the Nive and the Adour, on the constantly challenged border between France and Spain. It is a relatively easy city to navigate in and out of and is m... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Chateau de La Barre: Less than 10 miles from Chateau de La Barre, the riding centre of La Bellonniere offers not only a top notch indoor riding school, but the possibility for more experienced riders to take horses out for a half or even full day excursion through the beautif... more

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Just up from Les Détroits when traveling the path of the River Tarn as it cuts its way through the canyon, you will come to Belvédère du Pas de Souci. Numerous buses stop here and you can join the crowds to climb the steep metal stairway to views of the pools below (for a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

With its absolutely gorgeous setting, Biarritz inspires you to spend some time outdoors. Include a visit to the Biarritz Lighthouse, dating back to 1831, which towers 73 meters above the sea and (after a climb of 248 steps) offers an exceptional view of the town and Basque coastline. From the l... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Biarritz is a wonderful introduction to the style and life of Pays Basque. Once a whaling station, it is now recognized as a seaside resort of international renown. Don’t let its size intimidate you—as the residents will tell you, this is still a small town in heart and soul—l... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

With its absolutely gorgeous setting, Biarritz inspires you to spend some time outdoors. Include a visit to the Biarritz Lighthouse, dating back to 1831, which towers 73 meters above the sea and (after a climb of 248 steps) offers an exceptional view of the town and Basque coastline. From the l... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Bayonne is home to the Bonnat Museum, which houses a fine collection of art, considered one of the most prestigious collections outside Paris, including works by Goya, Raphael, Delacroix, Michelangelo, and Constable. For an in-depth study and presentation of the history of Bayonne as well as Ba... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Cannes is the center for many festivals, the most famous being the Cannes Film Festival held annually in May. The Boulevard de la Croisette is a wide street bordered by palm trees separating the beach from the elaborate grand hotels and apartment buildings. La Croissette is congested with stop-... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Alors, the Paris freeway network! A freeway, the Boulevard Périphérique, travels a ring around the city, and key roads that transect and travel to and from the heart of the city are accessed off the ring at well-marked portals or "portes." When leaving Paris, autorou... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Bayeux was the first French town to be liberated. On the ring road, opposite the museum, is the British Cemetery and Memorial, honoring the memory of 1,837 missing servicemen.... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Caen, a large port situated on the banks of the Orne and one of Normandy’s largest cities, lost nearly all of its 10,000 buildings in the Allied invasion of 1944. It is also the city that William the Conqueror made his seat of government. Your destination in Caen is the Memorial (Memorial... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Bed and Art:  The Camargue: the expansive marshland of the Rhône delta is home to pink flamingoes, white horses and unearthly water landscapes, as well as the colourful gypsy festival in Les Ste-Maries-de-la-Mer. On your way, do not miss the city of Aigues Mortes which is s... more

  • Property Recommended

Marseille is the second-largest city in France. Settled as a Phoenician colony, this major Mediterranean port is where our Provence itinerary begins. Apart from the Roman docks and fortified church of Saint Victor, there are few monuments to its past within the city. However, you must see La Ca... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Maison De La Porte Fortifiee: Chateau Lavardens is one of the most impressive castles in the Gers. This fortress dates back to the 12th century and is beautifully situated in the small village of Lavardens. Up on a hilltop, lifted high up in the sky: that is Chateau Lavardens... more

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Avignon was the papal residency from 1309 to 1377 and the Palais des Papes is a highlight of a visit to this lovely city—if only to stand on the main square and look up at the long, soft-yellow stone structure that dominates the city skyline, stretching the length of the square and toweri... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Aix en Provence is an elegant city. Aix achieved fame when “Good King René,” count of Provence, and his wife chose it as their preferred residence in the 1450s. Upon his death Aix fell under the rule of the French crown and was made the seat of parliament. The city flourished in the 17th a... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Recommended by Mas de L'Oulivie: Enter Cathedrale of Images located in the impressive limestone quarries of les Baux-de-Provence to experience the magical audiovisual program which changes each year. The effects take the visitor to the very heart of a universe of images on walls, floors and ... more

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Recommended by Domaine de l'Enclos: Finally after 10 years of preparation the Caves of Tourtoirac were opened to the public March 2010. They are located under the cliffs of Tourtoirac and known for their beautiful stone formations with magnificent varied colors. It is expected that these cav... more

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Just north of the Spanish border, Banyuls warrants a trip because of the impressive site of the cellars of Cellier des Templiers where you can enjoy a free, guided tour, sample wines from a region that has been producing wines for over seven centuries, and enjoy panoramic views of the surroundi... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

In the region of Alsace, Hunawihr boasts a much-photographed fortified church sitting on a little hill among the vineyards beside the village and the Center for the Reintroduction of Storks. Just a few years ago the roofs of the picture-book villages of AlsaceAfrica and the center is dedicated ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

Champs Elysees

The street by which all other grand boulevards are judged. The avenue runs from the Arc de Triomphe in the Place Charles de Gaulle in the west to the Place de la Concorde in the east. Lined with high end shops and restaurants,the Champs Elysees in one of the most expensive rental locations in t... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

The Champagne village of Dormans saw fierce fighting in World War I and was badly damaged. Set in a large green park, the Chapelle de la Reconnaissance (Chapel of Gratitude) commemorates those killed in the battles of the Marne in 1914 and 1918 and offers splendid views over the valley. ... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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Built on a rocky outcrop just below the village of Berze le Ville is a lovely 12th-century chapel, Chapelle des Moines. Commissioned by the abbot of Cluny, its first structure was destroyed by a storm but then rebuilt by Italians. Intimate with a Byzantine-influence architecture, it is especial... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

On the western edge of the dense Forest of Vénasque is a beautiful and striking hilltop village of Vénasque. Charmingly untouched by civilization, this village is tucked in a dense forest cupped between two steep hills and is notable for its 6th-century Église de Notre Dam... more

  • Karen Brown Recommended

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